Author Archives: Grace Healy

Fordham Undergraduates Attend Undergraduate Conference in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Moravian College

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On Saturday, December 5th, Professor Alex Novikoff took four Fordham Students to  the 10th Annual Undergraduate Conference in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Moravian College. The four students, all History majors, each presented a paper. Erin Collier presented, “The Role of Menstruation and Impurity in the Characterization of Jews as ‘The Other’ in Medieval Soceity,” Arthur Mezzo presented, “God and Kind: Biographies of Medieval Frankish Kings,” Rita Orazi presented, “The Emperor as Classical Hero in Ana Komnene’s Alexiad,” and Kyle Stelzer presented, “The Tibyan: One Ruler’s Account of Christian-Muslim Relations in Eleventh Century Iberia.”
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 Nice work, Fordham historians!

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Filed under Essays in History, Undergrad News, Undergraduate Research

Esther Liberman Cuenca Awarded Prestigious Schallek Fellowship

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Esther Lieberman Cuenca, recipient of the Schallek Fellowship

Fordham History Department’s own Esther Liberman Cuenca was recently awarded the Schallek Fellowship, a one-year grant of $30,000 to support Ph.D. dissertation research in any relevant discipline (art history, literature, history, etc.) dealing with late medieval Britain (ca. 1350-1500). Not only is this a prestigious honor but it will allow Esther to conduct research critical to the completion of her dissertation.

Esther’s research focuses on the development and evolution of borough customary law in medieval Britain. Borough customs were practices or traditions that over time acquired the force of law within the town. Her analytical goals are twofold: to contribute to a deeper understanding of the place of urban customary law within the British legal system, and to reveal custom’s role in the emergence of a distinct bourgeois identity in medieval Britain. Borough customary law has received little scholarly attention because of its scattered distribution in many local and county archives; the need for multi-lingual expertise in Latin, Anglo-Norman French, and Middle English; and the difficulty of dating customary clauses and ordinances from multiple iterative copies.

SROI C/4/1/1, f. 9a: The table of contents for the French Ipswich custumal, contained in the codex they call the 'Black Domesday.'

SROI C/4/1/1, f. 9a: The table of contents for the French Ipswich custumal, contained in the codex they call the ‘Black Domesday.’

Since she reached ABD status at Fordham in 2012, Esther has been teaching multiple courses at Marymount California University and this fellowship will give her the opportunity to focus fully on completing her dissertation. She plans to spend the 2016-2017 year living in England where she can complete her research at the Bristol Record Office and London Metropolitan Archives. In 2013, Esther was also the recipient of the Schallek Award, which is a small grant of $2,000 to help students cover research expenses. “The Medieval Academy/Richard III Society have been very kind to me! And I’m very grateful that they’re supporting my research,” says Esther. The History Department is grateful as well, and very excited for Esther to seize this opportunity!

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Filed under Grad Student News, Student Awards

Magda Teter: History’s New Professor of Jewish Studies Marks an Anniversary in Interfaith Relations

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The newest addition to the Fordham History Department and the first holder of the Shvidler Chair in Jewish Studies, Dr. Magda Teter, is making a name for herself and Fordham at home and abroad. On October 27, Dr. Teter presented at a conference on the Declaration Nostra Aetate in Lublin, Poland. Her presentation, “The Theological and Historical Jew in Jewish-Catholic Relations,” opened the conference and was a keynote address. The two other speakers were Riccardo di Segni, the Chief Rabbi of Rome, and Archbishop Henryk Muszyński, the Primate of Poland. The three addresses were followed by a discussion panel, which also featured prominent Jewish and Catholic participants, including the Chief Rabbi of Poland. Throughout the discussion. the panel continuously referred back to Dr. Teter’s talk, both a testament to her and the significance of history in the current discourse about Catholic-Jewish relations.

This conversation continued at the Fordham Annual Fall McGinley Lecture,  “Rejecting Hatred: Fifty Years of Catholic Dialogue with Jews and Muslins since Nostra Aetate on November 10-11. The lecture, which was given by Fordham’s own Professor Patrick J. Ryan, SJ, was followed by responses from Dr. Teter and Dr. Hussein Rashid from Hofstra University.

The History Department looks forward to the Shvidler Chair installation on Monday, November 16  in the Corrigan Center on the 12th floor of Lowenstein at 5:30PM. Dr.Teter will present a lecture entitled  “Alienation to Integration: Rethinking Jewish History”.

Welcome to the History Department, Magda Teter!

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by | November 13, 2015 · 9:00 am

On the Road with the Outremer Map Project

Bethlehem, from the Oxford Outremer Map

Bethlehem, from the digitally restored Oxford Outremer Map

Graduate students and fellows from the History Department and the Center for Medieval Studies at Fordham, under the direction of Dr. Nicholas Paul and Dr. Laura Morreale from each department respectively, are collaborating in an effort to open up the conversation and further understand a 13th century map which has not previously been studied in depth. Their project is called The Oxford Outremer Map and it is their goal to “use digital tools and the open global forum of the internet to bring to light a neglected medieval intellectual and cultural artifact.” Through the creation of their website, these collaborators not only hope to provide someone with a foundation of understanding of the map but also encourage other scholars to analyze it and contribute to the unfolding discussion.

Toby Hrynick, a first year PhD student in the History Department who received his MA in Medieval Studies, has been working on the project since its inception in the summer of 2014. On November 6, Toby will be taking the map project on the road, giving a conference paper about the map and participating in a digital workshop at the Haskins Society‘s Conference at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota.

We talked to Toby to get some more details on the project and his experience working on the map… Continue reading

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Filed under Digital Resources, Faculty News, Grad Student News, Publications, Uncategorized

Talking Through the Issues: A Podcast Series on the Crusader States

Screenshot 2015-10-19 20.52.34A new conversation has started within the History Department at Fordham. Under the direction of Dr. Nicholas Paul, graduate students in his Crusader States class are developing podcasts as a means to initiate discussion. The course, “charts the social, political, and cultural history of the feudal principalities (sometimes called “Crusader States” “the Latin East” or the ‘Frankish Levant”) that were established by Latin Christians in the Eastern Mediterranean in the wake of the First Crusade.” The podcasts, in turn, each focus on a specific theme within the current scholarship, from the background to the First Crusade in the Eastern Mediterranean, to the relationships between Latin Europeans and eastern Christians and Muslims, through the cultural, social, and political development of the Crusader States themselves

What are the advantages of the podcast format? Tom Schellhammer, a student in the course, commented that, “Historical scholarship must also embrace the current trend towards technological interaction,” as “Technology allows us to reach a wide audience, and this idea is a fantastic intro to anyone interested in learning more about the Crusader States. A podcast can build interest by succinctly covering the important discussion points on any one topic, and highlighting the importance of the topic and asking intriguing questions that spark even more debate and scholarship.”

For Tom, and all of the students in The Crusader States, further and broader discussion about the aftermath of the First Crusade is the ultimate goal, and they believe that using podcasts promotes that within and beyond their seminar. Tom says, “I think that as a class we have come up with some thought provoking questions which might benefit a larger community studying the Crusader States.   I find the material challenging and want to hear outside comments upon the work that we are doing, so I appreciate the opportunity to be heard and receive feedback on our discussions. On a topic that has interest in such widespread and diverse communities,  the podcasts truly help reach outside thoughts and opinions and ignite those same thoughts to be shared here at Fordham.”

Check out all the podcasts and listen to Tom address issues faced by the Crusader military and debate whether the creation of new states was inevitable in the aftermath of the First Crusade. History is about so much more than the sources analyzed and papers written– it is about sharing what we learn with others in hopes of creating an atmosphere of inquiry, debate, and ultimately, understanding.

 

 

 

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Filed under Courses, Digital Resources, Grad Student News

Lectures in Honor of Chris Schmidt-Nowara (1966-2015) Pioneer of Transatlantic and Antislavery Hispanic Caribbean Studies

Please join the Fordham History Department as it celebrates the life and work of Chris Schmidt-Nowara with a series of lectures, panels, and discussions on the fascinating variety of topics to which he dedicated his career. The first event will be held Monday, October 5, at 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm, 2nd Floor – Costantino Room (Fordham Law School). In collaboration with the United Nations, the Burial Database Project of Enslaved Americans and LALSI present Truth: Women, Creativity and the Memory of Slavery, with distinguished women artists and scholars from the Americas. The panel will discuss the representation of  slavery by women artists of African descent throughout the Americas.  Participating artists and scholars include:Yolanda Arroyo Pizarro
Novelist, Poet & Short-Story Writer

Aimee Meredith Cox, Cultural Anthropologist
Associate Chair, Depart. of African & African Amer. Studies, Fordham University

Nicole Fleetwood, Associate Professor
American Studies, Rutgers University

Yuko Miki, Assistant Professor
Iberian Atlantic History

Iyunolu Osagie, Associate Professor
English, Penn State

Gabriela Salgado, African & Latin American Contemporary Art Curator
London, UK

Deborah Willis, Photographer
Chair, Depart. of Photography & Imaging, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU

Read on to find out about further events this semester…

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Filed under Department Events, Events, Faculty News, In Memoriam

PhD Candidate Brandon Gauthier On The Fun and Reward of Academic Travel

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Brandon Gauthier at the World Congress for Korean Politics and Society, August 2015

Brandon Gauthier at the World Congress for Korean Politics and Society, August 2015

Brandon Gauthier, a PhD candidate in the History Department, traveled to South Korea this past summer where he presented personal research and reconnected with the culture he intimately studies. Here is what Brandon has to say about the trip…

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Filed under Grad Student News, Publications, Student Awards

Christopher Maginn on Discovering a Manuscript and his New Book: “The Tudor Discovery of Ireland”

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Professor Christopher Maginn recently co-authored The Tudor Discovery of Ireland; a text that analyzes how the Tudor family–and by extension Elizabeth I’s councilor William Cecil–came to understand Ireland’s history, people, and geography. What’s even cooler? Maginn, and co-author Steven G. Ellis, based their analysis on a previously unknown manuscript that Maginn found. Let’s see what Professor Maginn has to say on his new book, co-authoring, and the process of writing …

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Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty News, Publications

H-Net Commons: A multidisciplinary forum for publishing, learning, and sharing

Looking for faster and easier ways to publish? Want to interact with people in your field from all over the world? H-Net Commons is such a source for historians everywhere.  Continue reading

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Filed under Digital Resources, Grad Student News, Publications