Author Archives: Nana Osei-Opare

Prof. Stephanie Huezo Awarded Andres Torres Prize for Young Scholars in Latino Studies!

The Gastón Institute has awarded Professor Stephanie Huezo the Andrés Torres Prize. As a result, Prof. Huezo will give present a paper called, “Reading and Driving under Popular Education: Tracing Salvadoran-Inspired Activism in Maryland,” on Thursday, October 8th, 1-3pm EST.  Her paper will be part of UMass Boston’s celebrations for Hispanic Heritage Month.

You can RSVP at:

You can follow Prof. Huezo on Twitter @steph_huezo.

Prof. Stephanie Huezo

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Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty Profiles, Public History

Prof. Steven Stoll Publishes, “Charlie Chaplin and Karl Marx in Conversation: On Working and Being in Modern Times,” in Public Seminar.

On September 21, 2020, Professor Steven Stoll published, “Charlie Chaplin and Karl Marx in Conversation: On Working and Being in Modern Times,” in the Public Seminar,” in Public Seminar.

Stoll writes: “At a time when some predict that the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic could leave many unemployed for months or years, and when the working-class already endures the worst of everything, in a rolling crisis of despair, Modern Times doesn’t look like an excavated relic but a message from the dawn of the American Century to its dusk. The story of the Worker, played by Chaplin, and his homeless partner, the Gamin, played by Paulette Goddard, depicts alienation and disillusionment with capitalism, law enforcement, and the world of industrial work that had failed the working class.”

You can read the full article here.

Prof. Steven Stoll

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Recent History Ph.D. Esther Liberman Cuenca (who got a tenure-track job at the University of Houston, Victoria last year) Published in The Paris Review.

On September 17, 2020, a recent History Ph.D. from Fordham, Esther Liberman Cuenca (who got a tenure-track job at the University of Houston, Victoria last year) just published a very lively piece, “A Medieval Mother Tries Distance Learning,” in The Paris Review about advice that Dhuoda, a 9th-century noblewoman, wrote for her son who was a political hostage and thus separated from her. 

Her Twitter handle is @EstherLCuenca.

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Filed under Alumni News, Fordham News

Prof. Westenley Alcenat Makes Media Appearances on Scope & TRT World.

Here are the links to Prof. Alcenat’s two most recent media appearances:

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Meet Our Newest Faculty Member, Prof. Stephanie Huezo!

Prof. Huezo is one of our newest additions to our department and we are very excited to have her join us! She is a Professor of Central and Latin American History. Here is a brief conversation with her.

Stephanie Huezo
  1. What courses do you hope to teach at Fordham?

Aside from UHC: Latin America, I am excited to offer courses on Power and Resistance in Latin America, Central American History (both the region and the diaspora), and on popular education.

2. What do you on your off-time/leisure?

In my free time I enjoy playing board games with my friends and family. I watch quite a bit of T.V. as well. Recently, I’ve been watching Star Trek: The Next Generation, reruns of Sister Sister, the Golden Girls, and Netflix shows like 3%. I also aspire to one day be a good baker but for now, I bake pre-made goods and watch baking shows on TV.

3. Why are you excited about coming to Fordham?

I went to catholic schools in the Bronx so I grew up hearing about Fordham but I decided not to apply. However, I have always been intrigued by the University’s mission. I am excited to work at a place that values the student and worker as a whole. More importantly, as a first-generation college student and SalviYorker, I look forward to teach, and learn from, the young scholars at Fordham University.

4. Please briefly tell us about your research?

My research focuses on Salvadoran community organizing during the twentieth and twenty-first century in both El Salvador and the United States. I pay particular attention to how Salvadoran communities have used popular education to challenge the politics of legality and belonging.

5. What thing would no one know about you that you would like to share?

One thing that many new people don’t know about me is that I used to play club rugby at Wesleyan University and in Chile during study abroad. I had many positions but my favorite ones were as a Number 8 and hooker.  https://www.ruck.co.uk/rugby-positions-roles-beginners/

You can follow Prof. Stephanie Huezo @steph_huezo.

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In Memoriam the Victims of the El Paso Massacre, August 3, 2019

On Saturday, August 3, 2019, in El Paso, Texas, a 21 year old white male brandishing a semi-automatic rifle walked into a Walmart known to be popular with Americans and a convenient destination for Mexicans crossing the nearby border for their weekly shopping excursion into the United States. He began to shoot, deliberately targeting people of apparent Mexican and Latin  American descent. Twenty three people died in the shooting (the last dying in April of 2020), and another twenty three were injured. News organizations identified the dead as thirteen United States Americans, eight Mexicans, and one German citizen.  A deeper look, though, reveals that of the thirteen Americans killed, eleven were of Latinx descent. As a result, the El Paso Walmart shooting was the worst mass murder of Latino people in modern American history. 

The murderer has been identified as a white supremacist with a deep hatred of Latinos, someone who consumed white supremacist literature and wrote a manifesto at the time of the shooting. This is not a surprise, as in the last five years the United States also has suffered mass shootings of African Americans (Charleston, June 17, 2015) and Jews (October 27, 2018). In his manifesto, the shooter argued that Mexicans specifically, and Latinxs generally, are invading the United States, taking jobs away from U.S. citizens, and endangering the white majority populace. This rhetoric reveals anti-Latinx sentiments with roots deep in United States history. It also calls attention to the historical and continuous race-based and structural violence that affects minority communities in the U.S. and at the border.

Father McShane has suggested that the Fordham community commemorate and discuss these tragedies in November. For now, though, it is important to mourn the victims of August 3 and to remember how and why they died:

Andre Anchondo, 23

Jordan Anchondo, 24

Arturo Benavides, 60

Leonard Cipeda Campos, 41

Angelina Englisbee, 86

Maria Flores, 77

Raul Flores, 77

Guillermo Garcia, 36

Jorge Calvillo García, 61

Maribel Hernandez, 56

Adolfo Cerros Hernandez, 68

Alexander Gerhard Hoffman, 66

David Alvah Johnson, 63

Luis Alfonso Juarez, 90

Ivan Hilierto Manzano, 46

Gloria Irma Marquez

Elsa Mendoza Márquez, 57

Margie Reckard, 63

Sara Esther Regalado, 66

Javier Rodriguez, 15

María Eugenia Legarreta Rothe, 58

Teresa Sánchez de Freitas, 82

Juan Velázquez, 77

Father McShane asked the University Church to offer the Sunday (August 2) Mass on behalf of the victims and the El Paso community, an appropriate gesture for a community and a people very serious about their religious faith.

For our part, we mourn the dead and summon the living to reflect on what we can do to support our own communities.  The El Paso Museum of History will display a digital memorial in remembrance of August 3. The public can join virtually by submitting pictures and memories on Digital El Paso at http://www.digie.org. We invite you to take part and encourage everyone to become active in supporting some of those organizations working on behalf of our communities in El Paso, the Southwest, and in New York. We can best honor the dead by fighting for and supporting justice at home and around the nation: 

Local

Central American Legal Assistance: https://www.centralamericanlegal.info/

Latino Pride Center: http://www.latinopridecenter.org/
Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education https://www.casitamaria.org/ 

St. Jerome H.A.N.D.S Community Center: https://jeromehands.com/

Texas

In El Paso, Annunciation House, which has worked to house and support migrants and refugees on the border::  https://annunciationhouse.org/

Raices Texas: The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services  https://www.raicestexas.org/ways-to-give/donate/

Border Network for Human Rights: https://bnhr.org/about/history/

National

The Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights: https://www.theyoungcenter.org/

The National Day Laborer Organizing Network: https://ndlon.org/

United We Dream: https://unitedwedream.org/

In solidarity, 
David Myers and Stephanie Huezo (with help from William Hogue)

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Filed under Faculty News, Faculty Profiles, In Memoriam

Graduate Student Rachel Podd Publishes “Reconsidering maternal mortality in medieval England: aristocratic Englishwomen, c. 1236–1503” in Continuity and Change.

History graduate student Rachel Podd published her first essay, “Reconsidering maternal mortality in medieval England: aristocratic Englishwomen, c. 1236–1503,” in Continuity and Change.

Below is an abstract of the article:

“The characterisation of medieval childbirth as profoundly dangerous is both long-standing and poorly supported by quantitative data. This article, based on a database tracking the reproductive lives of 102 late medieval aristocratic Englishwomen, allows not only for an evaluation of this trope but also an analysis of risk factors, including maternal youth and short birth intervals. Supplemented with evidence from medieval medical tracts and osteoarchaeological data related to pubertal development and nutrition, this study demonstrates that reproduction was hardly the main driver of mortality among elite women.”

You can find the full paper here.

Rachel Podd

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Professor Christopher Maginn Publishes “Teaching the World of Queen Elizabeth I in the Age of SARS CoV-19” in The Sixteenth Century Journal.

On July 7, 2020, Professor Christopher Maginn has just published an article in a special Early Modern Classroom supplement (2020) devoted to teaching in the era of COVID-19. Below is a link to the piece. Someone may find its discussion of pedagogy useful.

You can read the piece on this link: https://www.escj.org/blog/teaching-world-queen-elizabeth-i-age-sars-cov-19.html

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Filed under Faculty News, Faculty Profiles, Faculty Profiles, Fordham News, Global History, Public History, Publications, Teaching

Professor Nana Osei-Opare published “When It Comes to America’s Race Issues, Russia Is a Bogeyman” in Foreign Policy Magazine.

On July 6, 2020, Fordham history Professor Nana Osei-Opare published an op-ed piece in Foreign Policy Magazine called, “When It Comes to America’s Race Issues, Russia Is a Bogeyman.”

You can read the piece on this link: https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/07/06/when-it-comes-to-americas-race-issues-russia-is-a-bogeyman/

You can follow him on Twitter @NanaOseiOpare.

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Filed under Faculty News, Faculty Profiles, Faculty Profiles, Global History, Public History, Publications

Professor Westenley Alcenat Published “Black Lives and the Fourth of July” in The Nation.

On July 3, 2020, Fordham history Professor Westenley Alcenat published an op-ed piece in The Nation called, ““Black Lives and the Fourth of July.”

You can read the piece on this link: https://www.thenation.com/article/society/juneteenth-independence-day/

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