Tag Archives: Awards

Two History Faculty Members Awarded The Prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship

We are absolutely delighted to announce that Fordham historians Scott Bruce and Yuko Miki are recipients of the 2020-2021 NEH fellowship. Below is a description of their fascinating projects.

Scott Bruce’s project is entitled, The Lost Patriarchs Project: Recovering the Greek Fathers in the Medieval Latin Tradition. Yuko Miki’s project is entitled, Brazilian Atlantic: Archives and Stories of Illegal Slavery.

The Lost Patriarchs Project: The influence of Greek patristics on western European thought and culture remains an important, but largely overlooked, aspect of the history of medieval Latin literature. The goal of my project is the creation of an instrument of reference called The Lost Patriarchs: A Survey of the Greek Fathers in the Medieval Latin Tradition.  This book will present a catalogue of the deep, largely untouched, reservoir of medieval Latin texts that have Greek Christian origins, both those known directly from surviving manuscript copies and those known indirectly from medieval library catalogues. It will provide an alphabetically arranged handbook that presents a series of concise accounts (500 to 10,000 words) of the manuscript tradition and transmission of Greek Christian literature in the medieval Latin tradition.  A reference tool of this kind would gather all this is known about these texts in current scholarship, allowing future researchers to begin the work of charting their influence in western Christian doctrine and devotional practices.

Brazilian Atlantic: This project is a narrative history of illegal slavery in the nineteenth-century Atlantic World. Through four intertwined stories about a slave ship and its captives, two West African men, a financier, and a Kongolese prince, it investigates how illegal slavery thrived throughout the Atlantic World in general, and in Brazil in particular, in the very midst of the “Age of Emancipation.” In paying attention to the lived experiences of women, men, and children forced into, or who profited from, illegal slavery, this project challenges the predominant, sweeping narratives of the nineteenth-century as the triumph of abolition, free trade, and liberal freedom. Through an ethnographic reading of the archives of illegal slavery, this project weaves together the past and present, historical characters and archival encounters to propose a new way of writing about the ambiguous histories of slavery and freedom that centers the suffering and afterlives of the enslaved.

** Yuko Miki’s photo was taken by Margarita Corporan Photography **

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by | January 16, 2020 · 2:41 am

BIG CONGRATULATIONS to Dr. Yuko Miki!

We are thrilled to announce that the American Historical Association has awarded Dr. Yuko Miki’s, Frontiers of Citizenship: A Black and Indigenous History of Postcolonial Brazil (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2018), the Wesley-Logan Prize for the best book in African diaspora history. Please reach out to Dr. Yuko Miki at ymiki1@fordham.edu to send her your heartfelt congratulations on receiving this wonderful achievement!!!

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Filed under Faculty Awards

Class of 2018 History Students Win Awards

Four graduating seniors successfully completed the rigorous requirements for departmental Honors in History. In order to qualify for Honors in History, a student must maintain a 3.5 or better GPA in History, complete an Honors tutorial and thesis or a Mannion Society thesis, and successfully complete a 5000-level graduate course in History. The five students who met these requirements this year were: Agata Sobczak ( Mannion Society 2017), Elizabeth Doty (Mannion Society, 2018), Nicholas Guthammar (Mannion Society, 2017), Giulio Ricciardi (Mannion Society, 2017), and Justin Tramonti (Mannion Society, 2017). Continue reading

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Filed under Student Awards, Undergrad News

PhD Candidate Glauco Schettini wins ASMI Postgraduate Essay Prize

Congratulation to Glauco Schettini for receiving the Association for the Study of Modern Italy Postgraduate Essay Prize. The ASMI is a UK-based organization founded in 1982 by the Oxford historian Christopher Seton-Watson, and promotes research into Italian history, society, culture, and politics from the eighteenth to twenty-first century.

Glauco’s essay, “Building the Third Rome: The New District in Prati di Castello, 1870-1895,” examines the creation of a new neighborhood in Prati di Castello (the area surrounding the Vatican) after Rome’s annexation to the Kingdom of Italy in 1870. Continue reading

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Filed under Essays in History, Grad Student News, Student Awards, Uncategorized

GSAS Fellowship Awarded to History PhD Candidate

Congratulations to Christine Kelly on being awarded the 2017-18 GSAS Higher Education Leadership Fellowship. The fellowship is designed as a collaborative mentorship for PhD candidates, through which the fellow engages with GSAS administration to learn the ins-and-outs of higher education administration and while providing their own ideas and insight into the graduate school to help better GSAS. Continue reading

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Filed under Grad Student News, Student Awards

Congratulations to Dr. Ryan Keating (Ph.D ’13)

Congratulations to Fordham alumnus Dr. Ryan Keating for his recent award as “Outstanding Junior Faculty Member.” Dr. Keating received his Ph.D from Fordham in 2013 for his dissertation, “’Give Us War in Our Time’: America’s Irish Communities in the Civil War Era.” He is an assistant professor at California State University San Bernardino in sunny southern California where he received the annual award.

 

On top of showing his Fordham trained teaching chops, Dr. Keating has become an administrative asset for CSUSB. He was named Dean’s Fellow and charged with coordinating the college’s assessment policies. He also co-chairs the University’s Graduation Initiative.

 

This does little to detract form his own research it seems, as Dr. Keating has found time to publish two forthcoming books on top of his other projects. The first book, Shades of Green: Irish Reginments, American Soldiers, and Local Communities in the Civil War Era is a social history that traces the soldiers who served in three Irish regiments from Connecticut, Illinois, and Wisconsin, and moves the historical discussion of 19th century Irish immigration away from major urban centers to illustrate ways in which immigrants across the nation understood their place in 19th century America and the meaning of their service in the Civil War. His second book, The Greatest Trial I Ever Had: The Civil War Letters of Margaret and Thomas Cahill will be an edited collection of letters written by Thomas Cahill, Colonel of the 9th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and his wife, Margaret, during the Civil War. This collection represents the largest corpus of letters written by an Irish-American woman during this period to ever be published. The collection also shows the unique perspective on the war from the 9th Connecticut, an Irish regiment that was stationed in the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana throughout the war, during occupational duty in the south. With these two soon-to-be-published works in his rearview mirror, Dr. Keating has focused on an upcoming study of 500 union veterans who relocated to southern California after their muster out of northern armies.

 

Once again, congratulations to Dr. Keating on his outstanding award and we will all be looking forward to his future publications!

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Filed under Alumni News, Publications, Teaching

History 2016 Award Winners Honored at GSAS Celebration

 

GSAS Award Winners 2016: (l-r) Jonathan Wood (Alumni Dissertation Fellowship), Sal Cipriano (Senior Teaching Fellowship), Melissa Arredia (GSAS Summer Fellowship), Jeffrey Doolittle (Research Fellowship), Michael Sanders (ACHA Assistantship), Elizabeth Stack (Higher Education Learning Junior Fellow), Christopher Rose (Vice President, Graduate Student Association)

Last week the Fordham Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS)  held their annual award ceremony for winners of fellowships and prizes administered internally at Fordham. This year’s was a special ceremony, as the GSAS also celebrated its Centennial. GSAS Dean Eva Badowska spoke about the history of the Graduate School and unveiled a digital timeline of its history. Read on to find out more about our award winners in 2016 & 2017.

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Filed under Grad Student News, Student Awards

Grace Healy Wins 2016 O’Connell Research Prize

O'Connell Award winner Grace Healy with her mentor Professor Steven Stoll

O’Connell Award winner Grace Healy with her mentor Professor Steven Stoll

This year, in conjunction with the department’s O’Connell Initiative, the History Department awarded a $250 O’Connell Research Award for the most original graduate student research on the history of global capitalism. This year’s winner was MA student Grace Healy, who won for her final research paper entitled  “Swamp or Climax Region? Congressional Perceptions of the Everglades, 1947-1989” We asked Grace for details of her research, and she reports:

 

My project focused on the Everglades in South Florida, specifically the way in which members of Congress have thought about that landscape over the course of the second half of the twentieth century. As the people who mark the boundaries of land that will be preserved, I believe that congressmen’s perceptions of land, ecosystems, and the environment in general are an important aspect of conservation history.
Everglades map
I became interested in the Everglades because I enjoy analyzing the contradictory (or balanced, based on your perspective) way that Americans have managed land. For example, large portions of the Everglades are being protected because of its distinct environment. At the same time, however, vast tracts of the Everglades have been altered and manipulated for commercial reasons. I think that attempting to understand why certain types of landscapes are managed in these divergent forms is not only important to a historical understanding of the United States but also relevant to the environmental movement going forward.
Professor Stoll was an excellent mentor throughout this project. At times he pushed me to think more critically about certain aspects, at other times he knew exactly what text I should read to gain more insight. I think he was most helpful when I was I was still developing my ideas. It can be really difficult to find the right project that can be completed in about a semester and half. Professor Stoll really helped me tailor my ideas so I could deeply investigate this one important aspect of the Everglades.
Congratulations on the O’Connell Prize Grace!

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Filed under Grad Student News, O'Connell Initiative, Student Awards

Fordham PhD Wins Taiwan Research Fellowship

Photo_Darryl_E_BrockDarryl E. Brock, Ph.D. (May 2014) just received the Taiwan Research Fellowship from the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office for winter and spring 2015. As a visiting scholar at the Academia Sinica, Darryl will work with government, diplomatic and NGO representatives on his project “Taiwan’s Diplomacy and Foreign Aid to Latin American Nations: An Assessment of Presidents Chen’s and Ma’s Differential Strategies.” As a prelude to this work, Darryl traveled to the Caribbean nation of St. Lucia this past August where he conducted in-depth interviews with the Taiwanese ambassador, as well as St. Lucian government officials.

 

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Filed under Grad Student News, Student Awards

PhD Student Brandon Gauthier Wins OAH Award

OAHlogoBrandon K. Gauthier received a John Higham Travel Grant from the Organization of American Historians and the Immigration and Ethnic History Society to present a paper at the OAH’s annual conference in April 2014.  His paper, entitled “‘Bring All the Troops Home Now!’ The American-Korean Friendship and Information Center and North Korean Public Diplomacy, 1971-1976,” detailed the history of a North Korean funded “anti-imperialist peace organization” in New York City that sought to generate public support for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and force the withdrawal of American forces from the Korean peninsula.  He is currently at work on a dissertation examining the intellectual and cultural history of U.S. foreign relations with the DPRK from 1948-1996.

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