Tag Archives: slavery

Professor Yuko Miki Receives Prestigious American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Award

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) announced that Prof. Yuko Miki is one of its 2020 cohort Fellows. The “ACLS Fellowship program honors scholars in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who have the potential to make significant contributions to knowledge in their fields.”

Yuko Miki’s project is entitled, “Emancipation’s Shadow: Stories of Illegal Slavery.” This project is a narrative history of illegal slavery in the nineteenth-century Atlantic World. Through four intertwined stories, it investigates how illegal slavery thrived throughout the Atlantic World in general, and in Brazil in particular, in the very midst of the “Age of Emancipation.” Attention to the lived experiences of women, men, and children forced into, or who profited from, illegal slavery challenges the predominant history of the nineteenth-century as a period marked by the triumph of abolition and freedom. Drawing on literary analysis and archival ethnography, this project asks how illegal slavery can critique these liberal, modernizing narratives that have been foundational to the study of slavery and abolition, and Atlantic world history more broadly.

Yuko Miki – Photograph credit to Margarita Corporan Photography

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Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty News, Faculty Profiles, Global History

Ph.D. Candidate Nicholas J. DeAntonis’ article, “The Transnational Fight to End the Saudi Arabian Slave Trade: The British Anti‐Slavery Society, the African American Press, and the American Jewish Congress, 1953‐1960” is Now Out!

Ph.D. Candidate Nicholas J. DeAntonis just published an article, “The Transnational Fight to End the Saudi Arabian Slave Trade: The British Anti‐Slavery Society, the African American Press, and the American Jewish Congress, 1953‐1960” in Peace & Change: A Journal of Peace Research.

Below is the article abstract:

This article examines the transnational efforts of the British Anti‐Slavery Society to end the Saudi Arabian slave trade, highlighting the liveliness of human rights activism throughout the 1950s. The Society’s abolitionist efforts both succeeded and failed at the UN’s Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery in 1956. The Society failed to pass effective enforcement to end the slave trade, due to the growing concern for sovereignty amid decolonization throughout the Global South. Ironically, as decolonization spread, the Society’s abolitionist efforts were hampered. The Society’s own government avoided assisting them, fearing the imperialist perception of such actions. Nonetheless, the Supplementary Convention internationalized the cause and produced essential allies across the Atlantic: the African American press and American Jewish Congress. In the ensuing years, these journalists and activists denounced the burgeoning US–Saudi alliance and assured the continuity of the abolitionist message in the United States and globally. Although it is beyond the scope of this article, significant evidence exists that this new critical coalition helped shape human rights policy in the Kennedy administration.

Here is the link to the article: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/pech.12395

Peace & Change publishes scholarly and interpretive articles on the achievement of a peaceful, just, and humane society. International and interdisciplinary in focus, the journal bridges the gap between peace researchers, educators, and activists. It publishes articles on a wide range of peace-related topics, including peace movements and activism, conflict resolution, nonviolence, internationalism, race and gender issues, cross-cultural studies, economic development, the legacy of imperialism, and the post-Cold War upheaval.

Nicholas J. DeAntonis

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Filed under Global History, Grad Student News, Publications

Two History Faculty Members Awarded The Prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship

We are absolutely delighted to announce that Fordham historians Scott Bruce and Yuko Miki are recipients of the 2020-2021 NEH fellowship. Below is a description of their fascinating projects.

Scott Bruce’s project is entitled, The Lost Patriarchs Project: Recovering the Greek Fathers in the Medieval Latin Tradition. Yuko Miki’s project is entitled, Brazilian Atlantic: Archives and Stories of Illegal Slavery.

The Lost Patriarchs Project: The influence of Greek patristics on western European thought and culture remains an important, but largely overlooked, aspect of the history of medieval Latin literature. The goal of my project is the creation of an instrument of reference called The Lost Patriarchs: A Survey of the Greek Fathers in the Medieval Latin Tradition.  This book will present a catalogue of the deep, largely untouched, reservoir of medieval Latin texts that have Greek Christian origins, both those known directly from surviving manuscript copies and those known indirectly from medieval library catalogues. It will provide an alphabetically arranged handbook that presents a series of concise accounts (500 to 10,000 words) of the manuscript tradition and transmission of Greek Christian literature in the medieval Latin tradition.  A reference tool of this kind would gather all this is known about these texts in current scholarship, allowing future researchers to begin the work of charting their influence in western Christian doctrine and devotional practices.

Brazilian Atlantic: This project is a narrative history of illegal slavery in the nineteenth-century Atlantic World. Through four intertwined stories about a slave ship and its captives, two West African men, a financier, and a Kongolese prince, it investigates how illegal slavery thrived throughout the Atlantic World in general, and in Brazil in particular, in the very midst of the “Age of Emancipation.” In paying attention to the lived experiences of women, men, and children forced into, or who profited from, illegal slavery, this project challenges the predominant, sweeping narratives of the nineteenth-century as the triumph of abolition, free trade, and liberal freedom. Through an ethnographic reading of the archives of illegal slavery, this project weaves together the past and present, historical characters and archival encounters to propose a new way of writing about the ambiguous histories of slavery and freedom that centers the suffering and afterlives of the enslaved.

** Yuko Miki’s photo was taken by Margarita Corporan Photography **

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by | January 16, 2020 · 2:41 am

Awards & High Recognitions Continue to Pour in for Yuko Miki’s Monograph!

We are absolutely delighted to announce that Fordham Historian Yuko Miki has received 3 honors across 3 different fields at the 2020 American Historical Association (AHA) for her book, Frontiers of Citizenship: A Black and Indigenous History of Postcolonial Brazil. She received the AHA’s Wesley-Logan Prize for African Diaspora History and the Conference on Latin American History (CLAH)’s Warren Dean Memorial Prize in Brazilian History. Moreover, she received an Honorable Mention from CLAH for the Howard F. Cline Prize in Latin American Ethnohistory. Frontiers of Citizenship was also a 2019 Outstanding First Book Award Finalist, Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD). We are so thrilled by her successes. Please congratulate Yuko Miki when you see her.

Below is the list of honors Frontiers of Citizenship has received so far:

  • 2019 Wesley-Logan Prize for the Best Book in African Diaspora History, American Historical Association (AHA)
  • 2019 Warren Dean Memorial Prize for the Best Book in Brazilian History, Conference on Latin American History (CLAH)
  • 2019 Honorable Mention, Howard F. Cline Prize for the Best Book in Ethnohistory, Conference on Latin American History (CLAH)
  • 2019 Honorable Mention for Best Book Prize, Latin American Studies Association 19th-Century Section
  • 2019 Outstanding First Book Award Finalist, Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD)

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Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty News, Faculty Profiles, Global History

Dr. Westenley Alcenat on CNN’s Erin Burnett’s OutFront

Our colleague, Dr. Westenley Alcenat, appeared on CNN’s Erin Burnett’s OutFront on May 4, 2019, and June 19, 2019, to discuss reparations.  

You can watch both of his appearances here:

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Filed under Faculty News

New Faculty-Graduate Student Working Group – Narrating Slavery: Archives, Poetics, Politics.

Professors Yuko Miki and Laurie Lambert have started a Faculty-Graduate working group called Narrating Slavery: Archives, Poetics, Politics.

The purpose of the group is to create a collaborative space for faculty and graduate students working on questions related to slavery to share work and receive feedback on their research-in-progress over the course of two meetings per semester.

The first meeting is on Thursday, October 3, from 12 pm – 1:30 pm, at Plaza View Room, Lowenstein, Lincoln Center Campus. Refreshments will be served.

We will be discussing the recent issue of the New York Times Magazine “The 1619 Project,” remembering the landing of the first Africans in Virginia.
You can access the essays here: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/14/magazine/1619-america-slavery.html

Their second meeting will be on Thursday, November 14, from 12 pm – 1:30 pm at the Plaza View Room. They will discuss an article in progress by Prof. Miki.

Please feel free to share this with any colleagues or graduate students whom you think might be interested. All are welcome, including faculty from other institutions in the area.

Please RSVP to Prof. Laurie Lambert at llambert3@fordham.edu or Prof. Yuko Miki at ymiki1@fordham.edu.

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Filed under Department Events, Events, outreach

Week Highlights

We are excited to announce just some of the fascinating activities members of the Fordham History Department have engaged in these last few weeks:

Prof. Rosemary Wakeman just edited and contributed an article to a special issue on “Shanghai: Heritage at the Crossroads of Culture” for the journal Built Heritage. The journal is published by the College of Architecture and Urban Planning at Tongji University in Shanghai. Her article on “Mid-Century Urban Avant-Gardes” compares Art Deco architecture in Shanghai and New York.

ISSUE 11 CONTENT | built-heritage
Prof. Rosemary Wakeman

Prof. Chris Dietrich just published a timely and thought-provoking piece in today’s Washington Post!” https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2019/09/27/how-war-forced-united-states-rethink-politics-oil/

You can follow Prof. Chris Dietrich on Twitter @CRWDietrich

Prof. Chris Dietrich

Prof. Amanda Armstrong-Price gave a fascinating presentation at NYU entitled “Strains of Permissiveness, Fields of Force: Governing Intimacies along the Railways of Colonial India.” The talk was hosted by The Postcolonial, Race, and Diaspora Studies Colloquium at NYU. You can find more details of Prof. Armstrong-Price’s talk here: https://www.facebook.com/events/2525672297648631/

Prof. Amanda Armstrong-Price

Prof. Wes Alcenat recently published a thought-provoking piece, “Freedom Without Citizenship, Reconciliation without Reparations,” on the African American Intellectual Historical Society’s award-winning blog, “Black Perspectives.”  https://www.aaihs.org/freedom-without-citizenship-reconciliation-without-reparations/

You can follow Prof. Wes Alcenat on Twitter at @wesalcenat

Prof. Wes Alcenat

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Filed under Faculty News, Public History, This week in Fordham History

Sven Beckert’s “Empire of Cotton”: A Conversation

1922 Alexandria docks

Dockworkers load cotton in the port of Alexandria, Egypt, 1921

Faculty and students in the History Department are getting extremely excited about the upcoming November 5 event to launch the O’Connell Initiative in the Global History of Capitalism. The event, which  will feature a talk by Harvard University’s Sven Beckert on “Tracking the Global History of Capitalism,” is particularly exciting for the faculty who have read and been inspired by Beckert’s  award-winning 2014 book Empire of Cotton: A Global History. We asked two members of our faculty, David Hamlin and Christopher Dietrich, to sit down and share their thoughts on the book. Their conversation is transcribed below, and it represents both a wonderful entry point into the book’s larger themes and a meditation on the value of studying capitalism from a global perspective. Continue reading

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Filed under Department Events, Faculty Profiles

Lectures in Honor of Chris Schmidt-Nowara (1966-2015) Pioneer of Transatlantic and Antislavery Hispanic Caribbean Studies

Please join the Fordham History Department as it celebrates the life and work of Chris Schmidt-Nowara with a series of lectures, panels, and discussions on the fascinating variety of topics to which he dedicated his career. The first event will be held Monday, October 5, at 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm, 2nd Floor – Costantino Room (Fordham Law School). In collaboration with the United Nations, the Burial Database Project of Enslaved Americans and LALSI present Truth: Women, Creativity and the Memory of Slavery, with distinguished women artists and scholars from the Americas. The panel will discuss the representation of  slavery by women artists of African descent throughout the Americas.  Participating artists and scholars include:Yolanda Arroyo Pizarro
Novelist, Poet & Short-Story Writer

Aimee Meredith Cox, Cultural Anthropologist
Associate Chair, Depart. of African & African Amer. Studies, Fordham University

Nicole Fleetwood, Associate Professor
American Studies, Rutgers University

Yuko Miki, Assistant Professor
Iberian Atlantic History

Iyunolu Osagie, Associate Professor
English, Penn State

Gabriela Salgado, African & Latin American Contemporary Art Curator
London, UK

Deborah Willis, Photographer
Chair, Depart. of Photography & Imaging, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU

Read on to find out about further events this semester…

Continue reading

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Filed under Department Events, Events, Faculty News, In Memoriam

H-Net Commons: A multidisciplinary forum for publishing, learning, and sharing

Looking for faster and easier ways to publish? Want to interact with people in your field from all over the world? H-Net Commons is such a source for historians everywhere.  Continue reading

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Filed under Digital Resources, Grad Student News, Publications