Category Archives: Faculty Profiles

Prof. Kirsten Swinth’s work featured in The New Yorker.

Prof. Jill Lepore’s January 11, 2021, article, “What’s Wrong With the Way We Work,” featured Prof. Kirsten Swinth’s work. Lepore writes, “Plenty of people still feel that way about their jobs. But Terkel’s interviews, conducted in the early seventies, captured the end of an era. Key labor-movement achievements—eight hours a day, often with health care and a pension—unravelled. The idea of the family wage began to collapse, as Kirsten Swinth points out in ‘Feminism’s Forgotten Fight: The Unfinished Struggle for Work and Family’ (Harvard).”  

Kirsten Swinth

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Prof. Christopher Dietrich publishes “Erasing the Marks of Domination: Economic Sovereignty, Decolonization, and International Lawmaking in the 1950s and 1960s” in Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d’histoire du droit international.

Prof. Christopher Dietrich publishes “Erasing the Marks of Domination: Economic Sovereignty, Decolonization, and International Lawmaking in the 1950s and 1960s” in Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d’histoire du droit international.

Below is the abstract:

This article tells a legal and intellectual history of oil and decolonization in the 1950s and 1960s through the projects of international institutions including the UN Permanent Sovereignty Commission and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and the work of anti-colonial lawyers Hasan Zakariya and Nicolas Sarkis. It examines the ideas and infrastructure of decolonization as they related to the question of how international law could be used to win economic sovereignty.

Christopher Dietrich
Christopher Dietrich

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Prof. Asif Siddiqi publishes “Whose India? SITE and the origins of satellite television in India” in History and Technology: An International Journal.

Prof. Asif Siddiqi publishes “Whose India? SITE and the origins of satellite television in India” in History and Technology: An International Journal.

Below is the abstract:

This essay explores the origins of the Satellite Instructional Technology Experiment (SITE), a project that used a NASA satellite to beam educational programs to over two thousand villages in India in the mid-1970s. Touted as a major success in using advanced technology for the purposes of poverty alleviation, the results of the project remain contested. I argue that the causes of its ambiguous outcome can be traced to the late 1960s when Indian and American scientific elites mobilized support for this project by uniting a coalition of diverse actors that each imagined a different ‘India’. Although each of these ‘Indias’ represented a starkly different vision of the nation, they were consonant for a brief historical moment, thus enabling SITE to come to reality. Their ability to do so depended on framing as monolithic and passive, the one population central to the project, the ‘poor and illiterate’ of India.

Asif Siddiqi
Asif Siddiqi

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Congratulations! Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s Book Receives Susan Socolow-Lyman Johnson Prize from the Conference on Latin American History.

Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s The People Are King: The Making of an Indigenous Andean Politics received the Susan Socolow-Lyman Johnson Prize. The People Are King has also been awarded the Flora Tristán Prize.

The People Are King

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Professor Kirsten Swinth has been awarded a Russell Sage Visiting Scholar Fellowship for the academic year 2021-2022.

Congratulations! Professor Kirsten Swinth has “been awarded a Russell Sage Visiting Scholar Fellowship for the academic year 2021-2022. This is a highly prestigious award, with the Foundation granting about 15 Visiting Scholar awards a year, and in the last six years, only four historians have received the fellowship. The Russell Sage Foundation is broadly dedicated to “the improvement of social and living conditions in the United States.”

You can follow her on Twitter @kswinth.

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Prof. Huezo to give a presentation at the Latin American Philosophy of Education Society (LAPES) on October 23.

The Latin American Philosophy of Education Society (LAPES) is hosting their final two events for their online symposium, Learning Across Liberation Theologies, to explore the links between liberation theology, pedagogy, and activism. We gather front-line educators, movement organizers, and practitioners and scholars of Liberation Theology to address these themes. This week the themes are “Caribbean/Latin American Liberation Theologies.” and “Black Radical Tradition”

Prof. Stephanie Huezo will be giving a presentation entitled “Pedagogy, Community, and Survival in the Salvadoran Revolution” on Friday, October 23, 2020, from 6-8pm ET. The presentation will be in English with Spanish interpretation.


Friday, Oct. 23: Caribbean/Latin American Liberation Theologies (with Spanish interpretation)

Speakers:

 ● Sylvia Marcos, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and Universidad Iberamericana – Keynote 

● Stephanie M. Huezo, Fordham University 

● Tito Mitjans Alayón, CESMECA, UNICACHModerated by Conor Tomás Reed, CUNY 

Saturday, Oct. 24: Black Radical Tradition

Speakers: 

● Mark L. Taylor, Princeton Theological Seminary – Keynote 

● Rashad Moore, First Baptist Church of Crown Heights and Columbia University

● Sharon Gramby-Sobukwe, Eastern University

Moderated by Jason Wozniak, West Chester University

Registration: https://bit.ly/2FoerN5

YouTube livestream: www.youtube.com/RafaelVizcainoR

Stephanie Huezo
Stephanie Huezo

You can follow Prof. Stephanie Huezo on Twitter @steph_huezo.

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Prof. Asif Siddiqi Publishes Book Review, “Transcending Gravity: The View from Postcolonial Dhaka to Colonies in Space,” in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

On October 12, 2020, Prof. Asif Siddiqi published, “Transcending Gravity: The View from Postcolonial Dhaka to Colonies in Space,” in The Los Angeles Review of Books.

Asif Siddiqi

You can follow Prof. Asif Siddiqi on Twitter @historyasif.

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Prof. Asif Siddiqi is Featured in The National Geographic.

Professor Asif Siddiqui was featured in an October 7, 2020, National Geographic article, “How the ‘right stuff’ to be an astronaut has changed over the years.”

Prof. Siddiqi is quoted:

“They’re green,” says Fordham University history professor Asif Siddiqi of the first group of cosmonauts. “You essentially have the space program mold and shape them.”

The author Jay Bennett continues, “As the U.S. and U.S.S.R. gained experience flying people in space, they began to attempt more complicated missions, such as docking in orbit and sending astronauts outside their spacecraft. In the astronaut selection process, the two space programs put more emphasis on engineering education, and the Soviet program raised its standards for flight time, making the second group of astronauts older and more experienced than the first, Siddiqui says. Buzz Aldrin, selected in the third group of NASA astronauts in 1963, was the first person to join the corps with a doctoral degree (in astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology).”

Asif Siddiqi

You can follow Prof. Asif Siddiqi on Twitter @historyasif.

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Prof. Kirsten Swinth Publishes “What Ruth Bader Ginsburg Learned From Swedish Social Democracy” in the Jacobin Magazine.

On September 29, 2020, Prof. Kirsten Swinth published, “What Ruth Bader Ginsburg Learned From Swedish Social Democracy,” in Jacobin Magazine.

She begins the article by writing: “The pioneering sex-discrimination law casebook that Ruth Bader Ginsburg published with two of her colleagues in 1974 closes, after nine-hundred and twenty-seven pages, with a brief chapter of “Comparative Side-Glances.” Ginsburg and her colleagues avowed a “modest purpose” for the pages that followed. They sought merely “to suggest the breadth of the movement toward equal rights for men and women” that went well beyond the borders of the United States. The side-glances, however, had a rather surprising focus: Sweden.”

You can read more here.

Kirsten Swinth

You can follow Prof. Kirsten Swinth on Twitter @kswinth.

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Prof. Stephanie Huezo Awarded Andres Torres Prize for Young Scholars in Latino Studies!

The Gastón Institute has awarded Professor Stephanie Huezo the Andrés Torres Prize. As a result, Prof. Huezo will give present a paper called, “Reading and Driving under Popular Education: Tracing Salvadoran-Inspired Activism in Maryland,” on Thursday, October 8th, 1-3pm EST.  Her paper will be part of UMass Boston’s celebrations for Hispanic Heritage Month.

You can RSVP at:

You can follow Prof. Huezo on Twitter @steph_huezo.

Prof. Stephanie Huezo

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