Category Archives: Faculty Awards

Prof. Yuko Miki Receives Fordham’s Distinguished Researcher Award in the Humanities for Her Work on the Black and Indigenous Histories of Brazil and the Atlantic World.

Prof. Yuko Miki receives Fordham’s Distinguished Researcher Award in the Humanities. You can watch and join the ceremony and celebrate with Prof. Miki at the below details.

Fordham University’s Online Research Day 
 
Organized by
 

Office of the Provost
Office of Research
University Research Council 
 
Sponsored by
 

Office of Sponsored Programs
Research Deans’ Council 

Wednesday, April 14, 2021
10:00 am – 3:30 pm
 
Fordham University
 
Zoom information:

Zoom link
Meeting ID: 814 4763 2911, Passcode: 790020

Yuko Miki (Photograph by Margarita Corporan Photography)

Comments Off on Prof. Yuko Miki Receives Fordham’s Distinguished Researcher Award in the Humanities for Her Work on the Black and Indigenous Histories of Brazil and the Atlantic World.

Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty News, Faculty Profiles

Prof. Magda Teter’s book, Blood Libel: On the Trail of an Anti­se­mit­ic Myth Libel, wins National Jewish Book Award.

The Jewish Book Council awarded Prof. Magda Teter‘s book, Blood Libel: On the Trail of an Anti­se­mit­ic Myth Libel, the JDC-Herbert Katzki Award. Prof. Teter is the Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies and Professor of History.

Magda Teter
Magda Teter

Comments Off on Prof. Magda Teter’s book, Blood Libel: On the Trail of an Anti­se­mit­ic Myth Libel, wins National Jewish Book Award.

Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty Profiles, Faculty Profiles

Congratulations! Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s Book Receives Susan Socolow-Lyman Johnson Prize from the Conference on Latin American History.

Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s The People Are King: The Making of an Indigenous Andean Politics received the Susan Socolow-Lyman Johnson Prize. The People Are King has also been awarded the Flora Tristán Prize.

The People Are King

Comments Off on Congratulations! Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s Book Receives Susan Socolow-Lyman Johnson Prize from the Conference on Latin American History.

Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty News, Faculty Profiles

Professor Kirsten Swinth has been awarded a Russell Sage Visiting Scholar Fellowship for the academic year 2021-2022.

Congratulations! Professor Kirsten Swinth has “been awarded a Russell Sage Visiting Scholar Fellowship for the academic year 2021-2022. This is a highly prestigious award, with the Foundation granting about 15 Visiting Scholar awards a year, and in the last six years, only four historians have received the fellowship. The Russell Sage Foundation is broadly dedicated to “the improvement of social and living conditions in the United States.”

You can follow her on Twitter @kswinth.

Comments Off on Professor Kirsten Swinth has been awarded a Russell Sage Visiting Scholar Fellowship for the academic year 2021-2022.

Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty Profiles, Faculty Profiles, Fordham News

Prof. Stephanie Huezo Awarded Andres Torres Prize for Young Scholars in Latino Studies!

The Gastón Institute has awarded Professor Stephanie Huezo the Andrés Torres Prize. As a result, Prof. Huezo will give present a paper called, “Reading and Driving under Popular Education: Tracing Salvadoran-Inspired Activism in Maryland,” on Thursday, October 8th, 1-3pm EST.  Her paper will be part of UMass Boston’s celebrations for Hispanic Heritage Month.

You can RSVP at:

You can follow Prof. Huezo on Twitter @steph_huezo.

Prof. Stephanie Huezo

Comments Off on Prof. Stephanie Huezo Awarded Andres Torres Prize for Young Scholars in Latino Studies!

Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty Profiles, Public History

Prof. Nana Osei-Opare awarded the Beacon Exemplar Certificate of Excellence Award from the United Student Government at Fordham.

The United Student Government at Fordham University awarded Prof. Osei-Opare the Beacon Exemplar Certificate of Excellence Award in recognition of his outstanding dedication to inspiring, supporting, & motivating students. The award is the highest that the United Student Government can give.

You can follow Prof. Nana Osei-Opare on Twitter @NanaOseiOpare

Nana Osei-Opare

Comments Off on Prof. Nana Osei-Opare awarded the Beacon Exemplar Certificate of Excellence Award from the United Student Government at Fordham.

Filed under Faculty Awards

Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s Book, “The People Are King: The Making of an Indigenous Andean Politics,” Awarded the 2020 Flora Tristán Prize

We are excited to announce that the Peru Section of the Latin American Studies Association has awarded Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s new book, The People Are King: The Making of an Indigenous Andean Politics (Oxford University Press, 2019), the 2020 Flora Tristán Prize for the best book on Peru published in the previous year.

Comments Off on Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s Book, “The People Are King: The Making of an Indigenous Andean Politics,” Awarded the 2020 Flora Tristán Prize

Filed under book history, Faculty Awards, Faculty News, Faculty Profiles

Professor Yuko Miki Receives Prestigious American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Award

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) announced that Prof. Yuko Miki is one of its 2020 cohort Fellows. The “ACLS Fellowship program honors scholars in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who have the potential to make significant contributions to knowledge in their fields.”

Yuko Miki’s project is entitled, “Emancipation’s Shadow: Stories of Illegal Slavery.” This project is a narrative history of illegal slavery in the nineteenth-century Atlantic World. Through four intertwined stories, it investigates how illegal slavery thrived throughout the Atlantic World in general, and in Brazil in particular, in the very midst of the “Age of Emancipation.” Attention to the lived experiences of women, men, and children forced into, or who profited from, illegal slavery challenges the predominant history of the nineteenth-century as a period marked by the triumph of abolition and freedom. Drawing on literary analysis and archival ethnography, this project asks how illegal slavery can critique these liberal, modernizing narratives that have been foundational to the study of slavery and abolition, and Atlantic world history more broadly.

Yuko Miki – Photograph credit to Margarita Corporan Photography

Comments Off on Professor Yuko Miki Receives Prestigious American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Award

Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty News, Faculty Profiles, Global History

Professor Magda Teter Receives NEH Senior Scholar Fellowship at the Center for Jewish History

We are absolutely delighted to announce that Fordham historian Magda Teter is a recipient of the 2020-2021 NEH Senior Scholar Fellowship at the Center for Jewish History. 

Below is a description of her fascinating project.

Magda Teter

Project Title: “The Dissemination and Uses of the Jewish Past: The Role of The Present in The Production and Politics of History.”  

Project Description: As historian Michel-Rolph Trouillot noted in his groundbreaking book on the production of history, Silencing the Past, “history is always produced in a specific historical context.” Trouillot’s work distinguished between “what happened”—the historical events, and “what is said to have happened”—how historians, professional or not, recount historical events. Thus, not just the context of the historical events matters, but also the historical context of the time in which historians do their work. The overarching questions that loom over my project concern the impact of the present on the study of the past and the compounding effects on the shaping of the field—beyond the known connections with political emancipation, i.e., the acquisition of equal rights by Jews, religious reform, and nationalism that played an important role in shaping the works of Jewish history. When Jewish Studies emerged in the nineteenth century, the field and its scholars were excluded from the academy, but they formed scholarly societies and institutes, published scholarly books and journals. The topics that interested these early scholars were inflected by their own personal interests related to the social and political position of Jews in Europe. They were concerned with current events. Many journals related to Jewish Studies, in fact, devoted a separate section to contemporary events, and allowed for a more rapid response to the current events by publishing not only studies but also primary sources from the archives. These primary sources, in turn, influenced generations of scholars and scholarly projects. And yet, modern scholars have sometimes used these sources uncritically, neglecting to examine how these primary texts and images entered circulation, what might be missing, and of what conversation these sources were a part. My project will explore that.

Comments Off on Professor Magda Teter Receives NEH Senior Scholar Fellowship at the Center for Jewish History

Filed under Faculty Awards, Faculty News, Faculty Profiles

Two History Faculty Members Awarded The Prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship

We are absolutely delighted to announce that Fordham historians Scott Bruce and Yuko Miki are recipients of the 2020-2021 NEH fellowship. Below is a description of their fascinating projects.

Scott Bruce’s project is entitled, The Lost Patriarchs Project: Recovering the Greek Fathers in the Medieval Latin Tradition. Yuko Miki’s project is entitled, Brazilian Atlantic: Archives and Stories of Illegal Slavery.

The Lost Patriarchs Project: The influence of Greek patristics on western European thought and culture remains an important, but largely overlooked, aspect of the history of medieval Latin literature. The goal of my project is the creation of an instrument of reference called The Lost Patriarchs: A Survey of the Greek Fathers in the Medieval Latin Tradition.  This book will present a catalogue of the deep, largely untouched, reservoir of medieval Latin texts that have Greek Christian origins, both those known directly from surviving manuscript copies and those known indirectly from medieval library catalogues. It will provide an alphabetically arranged handbook that presents a series of concise accounts (500 to 10,000 words) of the manuscript tradition and transmission of Greek Christian literature in the medieval Latin tradition.  A reference tool of this kind would gather all this is known about these texts in current scholarship, allowing future researchers to begin the work of charting their influence in western Christian doctrine and devotional practices.

Brazilian Atlantic: This project is a narrative history of illegal slavery in the nineteenth-century Atlantic World. Through four intertwined stories about a slave ship and its captives, two West African men, a financier, and a Kongolese prince, it investigates how illegal slavery thrived throughout the Atlantic World in general, and in Brazil in particular, in the very midst of the “Age of Emancipation.” In paying attention to the lived experiences of women, men, and children forced into, or who profited from, illegal slavery, this project challenges the predominant, sweeping narratives of the nineteenth-century as the triumph of abolition, free trade, and liberal freedom. Through an ethnographic reading of the archives of illegal slavery, this project weaves together the past and present, historical characters and archival encounters to propose a new way of writing about the ambiguous histories of slavery and freedom that centers the suffering and afterlives of the enslaved.

** Yuko Miki’s photo was taken by Margarita Corporan Photography **

Comments Off on Two History Faculty Members Awarded The Prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship

by | January 16, 2020 · 2:41 am