Category Archives: Department Events

History Colloquium Conference: Tuesday May 16 4PM McNally Amphitheater, Lincoln Center Campus

The History Department is Proud to Announce our 2017 History Colloquium Conference, to be held on Tuesday May 16  from 4-8PM in the McNally Amphitheater, Lincoln Center Campus.

The schedule will be as follows:

Panel 1: Twentieth Century Transnational Human Rights & Migration (4:00-5:00)

Lisa Betty, “‘Jamaiquinos en Cuba’: The Transregional Migration of Jamaicans to Cuba in the 20th Century”

William Hogue, “Proxy-Wars of Religion: US Neoliberal Theology and Central American Revolutions”

Nicholas DeAntonis, “The International Struggle to End the Saudi Arabian Slave Trade: The British Anti-Slavery Society, the United Nations, and the African-American Press, 1953-1960”

 

Panel II: Culture and Politics in Twentieth Century New York (5:00-5:45)

Jordyn May, “Votes for Women: The Visual Culture of the Suffrage Movement in New York”

Nicole Siegel, “God of Vengeance: Indecent?”

 

Break: 5:45-6:00

 

Panel III: State & Society (6:00-7:00)

Thomas Schellhammer, “The Evolution of the Third Republic and its Army: French Military Reforms and Society, 1871-1914”

Patrick Nolan, “Crimes and Punishments: Hanjian Trials After the Second Sino-Japanese War.”

Scott Brevda, “In the Eyes of My Father: Germany, Armenia, and the Morgenthau Plan”

 

Panel IV: Eighteenth-Century Politics and Culture (7:00:7:45)

Micheal Wootton, “French Perceptions of the American Revolution and Early Republic.”

Glauco Schettini, “Between Reform and Revolution: Jews, Public Utility, and National Belonging in Late Eighteenth-Century Italy.”

 

Reception to follow.

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Medieval Political Cultures Conference: Friday May 5, 9:30AM-2PM Campbell Multipurpose Room

Each year the Seminar course in Medieval History holds a mini-conference to exhibit the works of our medieval history students. This year’s conference will take place on Friday, May from 9:30AM until 2PM in the Campbell Multipurpose Room, Campbell Hall on the Rose Hill Campus. Snacks and refreshments will be served. Come along, all are welcome!

Sessions and papers are as follows:

Panel I: From East to West 9:30-10:30

Meghan KaseConditrix Augusta: The Architectural Patronage of the Empress Theophano

Hannah Graham – Space and Demonstrations of Power in the Architecture of the Principality of Achaia

Andrew Kayaian – “Fullness of Power”: The Ecclesiology of Innocent III and Papal Relations with the Armenian Church and State

Panel II: Locality and the Sacred 10:30-11:30

Michael Lipari – “Where the Word of God Does Not Have Root”: The Archbishop of Reims and the Nobility of Champagne in the 13th Century

Jake Prescott – Neither North nor South: The Limousin as a Distinct Cultural Space c. 1220

Martin Nelson – “Such a Splendor of Brightness:” The Establishment of Knud Lavard’s Cult at Ringsted in Religious Narrative

Panel III: Locality and the Secular 12:00-1:00

Stephen Powell – The Pen is Mightier than the Earl’s Sword: The De Laude Cestrie and the Formation of an Independent Cestrian Political Identity

Andrew Thornbrooke – “A Power Above You”: Concepts of Autonomy in the Letters of Pope Innocent III and Guilhem VIII of Montpellier

Sally Gordon – Win the War – Buy Bonds! City-States, Princes, and Sovereign Debt in the Age of Edward I

Panel IV: Borders and Frontiers 1:00-2:00

Michael J. Sanders – Forgotten Roads to Jerusalem: The Iter per Hispaniam According to Ramon Llull and Garcías de Ayerbe

Joseph McKenna – On the Stage of Acre: The Players and Their Roles during the Siege

Rebecca Katharine-Fionna Bartels – Remembering the Truth: The Political Sacrality of Aleppo in 12th Century Islamic Historiography

 

 

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Timothy Brook Delivers O’Connell Lecture on Capitalism and the Law of the Sea in 17th Century Java

Fordham University was honored to host Professor Timothy Brook this last Wednesday in the McNally Auditorium as part of the O’Connell Initiative on the Global History of Capitalism. Prof. Brook has spent his prolific career studying cultural and social history in Southeast Asia. From the Ming Dynasty in 14th to 17th century China to the Japanese occupation of China during WWII, Dr. Brook has authored numerous monographs, including the acclaimed Vermeer’s Hat: The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World (London: Profile Books, 2009) and, most recently, The Troubled Empire: China in the Yuan and Ming Dynasties (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2010).

Prof. Brook’s presentation, an ongoing research project titled “What to do when Chinese Try to Burn Down your Warehouse: Legal Plurality in Trading Ports at the Turn of the 17th Century,” was a captivating collection of stories and theories regarding the burgeoning role of capitalism in the Southeast Asian port city of Bantam. Eyebrow-raising title aside,  Brook’s pithy and poignant ideas on capitalism gave the gathered crowd much to discuss in the following Q&A. During both the presentation and resulting discussion, Brook maintained that, “capitalism may have emerged in Europe, but only because of Europe’s engagement with the rest of the world.” Brook elaborated his examination of the legal troubles that plagued the Europeans’ imperialist endeavors through four stories culled from the diary of the early 17th century English trader Edmund Scott. Such legal troubles may have hampered immediate European imperialism in each specific case, but they may have also formed a framework by which the European powers could then apply when trading with other plundered nations. Such legal cases after all gave rise to Huig de Groot’s Mare Liberum and the ensuing legal debate on the law of the seas.

The History Department would like to extend its sincerest thanks to Professor Timothy Brook and the O’Connell Initiative for taking the time to present his insightful and illuminating research.

For more on Professor Brook’s talk, see here.

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Art Historian Speaks on the Place of Islamic Artworks in Christian Spain

During a visit to New York to attend the College Art Association conference (CAA) Professor Antonio Urquízar Herrera from the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia in Madrid stopped by Fordham’s Rose Hill campus to speak to a group of faculty and graduate students. As the group enjoyed lunch courtesy of the History Department Professor Urquízar-Herrera discussed his forthcoming book Admiration and Awe: Morisco Buildings and Identity Negotiations in Early Modern Spanish Historiography, which examines how Spanish Christian historians of the sixteenth century processed the presence of Islamic architecture at the heart of their cities. Particularly in Andalusia, where the last Muslim controlled towns were conquered by Christian powers in 1492, writers who wanted to describe the glory of their cities had to contend with monumental works of Islamic architecture. How, if at all, did they acknowledge the origins of these buildings, so patently different from their own Gothic cathedrals and palaces? Following a lively talk, the visiting art historian was generous enough to discuss his manuscripts, religious appropriation, and ideas concerning race and identity in Early Modern Spain with several graduate students.

 

The department, and especially the students who stuck around for the discussion, would like to thank Professor Herrera for his illuminating presentation. “Admiration and awe” captures the feelings of the Fordham audience quite nicely!

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Spring 2017 O’Connell Event: Timothy Brook to Speak on March 8

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Race and Public Education in NYC – A Town Hall Meeting

The Bronx African American History Project will be hosting a town hall meeting on Race and Public Education in NYC, Tuesday, February 21st at Walsh Library, Fordham University. The event will begin at 7pm in the Flom Auditorium with a food and drink reception to follow.

This event will be co-sponsored by the Bronx African American History Project and the Department of African and African American Studies at Fordham University, Bronx Educators United for Justice, ASILI – The Black Student Alliance at Fordham, and The Fordham Club’s Bronx Collaboration Committee.
Please RSVP to the event here.
For additional event information please contact:

Lisa Betty: lbetty1@fordham.edu
Mark Naison: naison@fordham.edu
bronxeducatorsunited4justice@gmail.com

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Holiday Parties, Congratulations, and a New Year.

As the Fall Semester ebbed away and the occasional flurry of snowflakes blanketed Keating Hall, the History Department was busy letting off some end-of-semester stress with the annual holiday party in McGinley Hall. Bellies were filled with food and refreshments while hearts were broken in a rapacious white elephant gift exchange. Merrymaking and revelry aside, following department tradition the party was also the venue for the announcement of the 2015-6 Loomie Prize. This year Tobias Hrynick won for his project entitled, “Docke and Recordane: The Case Study of a Milling Dispute in the Latin East.” Congrats Toby!

Dr. David Myers (left) and Dr. Nicholas Paul (right) present Tobias Hrynick (center) with the 2015-6 Loomie Prize.

Dr. David Myers (left) and Dr. Nicholas Paul (right) present Tobias Hrynick (center) with the 2015-6 Loomie Prize.

Giulia Crisanti poses with her white elephant gift: a brown monkey mug.

Giulia Crisanti poses with her white elephant gift: a brown monkey mug.

Being the victim of constant white elephant thievery doesn't keep Dr. Mark Naison's holiday spirits down.

Being the victim of constant white elephant thievery doesn’t keep Dr. Mark Naison‘s holiday spirits down.

The History Department would like to welcome back faculty and students as the winter break ends and the new year begins. Congrats to everyone for making it through 2016, and congrats once again to Toby on his Loomie Prize!

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History Hosts Samuel Moyn for Human Rights Discussion at Lincoln Center

the_last_utopia_by_samuel_moyn-460x307More than 150 students gathered on November 30, 2016, to have a conversation about the place of human rights in post World War II world with the world’s leading scholar on the subject — professor Samuel Moyn The Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Professor of Law and Professor of History at Harvard University.  Moyn did not lecture.  After briefly telling the students what drew him to study human rights he engaged them in a dialogue in which our own undergraduates distinguished themselves and our university by asking nuanced sophisticated questions that demonstrated both mastery of Moyn’s work, which they read in preparation for the visit, and command of world’s affair.

moynThe event with the students was followed by a dinner discussion with professor Moyn in which diverse faculty from different departments and both campuses discussed the fundamental challenges of human rights policy and diplomacy such as the articulation of human rights, the distinctions between human rights, civil rights, and social and economic rights, the place of the nation state in promoting and protecting human rights, and the pitfalls of humanitarian intervention. (thanks to Doron Ben Atar for this blog post)

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Seeing Red, Feeling Blue: Historians Discuss the 2016 Election (11/21 11:30AM KE1st)

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The oldest known US electoral map, of the 1880 presidential election. Source: LA Times/Library of Congress

Join us on Monday, November 21 at 11:30 in the Keating 1st auditorium for a panel of Fordham historians discussing the 2016 Presidential election in historical perspective. Participants will include: Salv Acosta, Kirsten Swinth, Christopher Dietrich and Magda Teter

 

 

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Maryanne Kowaleski to Discuss Criminalizing Women’s Gossip in Late Medieval England (11/14 3:30 PM)

kowaleski-gossip-talk-2

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