Tag Archives: American history

Dr. Laurence Jurdem publishes a new book, “The Rough Rider and The Professor: Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Cabot Lodge, and The Friendship that Changed American History.”

Dr. Jurdem’s book, The Rough Rider and The Professor, chronicles the nearly forty-year friendship between Theodore Roosevelt and Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, illuminating the impact that their relationship had on American history, and showing how many of the critical issues facing our nation today, including big corporations, income inequality, immigration, demographic shifts, tariffs, and the future of the Republican Party, dominated headlines during Roosevelt’s presidency and remain at the forefront of American politics and society today, to Claiborne Hancock at Pegasus.

Laurence Jurdem (@LaurenceJurdem) | Twitter
Dr. Laurence Jurdem

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Prof. Saul Cornell, the Paul and Diane Guenther Chair in American History, published “What today’s Second Amendment activists forget: The right to not bear arms” in The Washington Post.

On January 18, 2021, Prof. Saul Cornell, the Paul and Diane Guenther Chair in American History, published “What today’s Second Amendment activists forget: The right to not bear arms” in The Washington Post.

Prof. Saul Cornell
Prof. Saul Cornell

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Prof. Kirsten Swinth’s work featured in The New Yorker.

Prof. Jill Lepore’s January 11, 2021, article, “What’s Wrong With the Way We Work,” featured Prof. Kirsten Swinth’s work. Lepore writes, “Plenty of people still feel that way about their jobs. But Terkel’s interviews, conducted in the early seventies, captured the end of an era. Key labor-movement achievements—eight hours a day, often with health care and a pension—unravelled. The idea of the family wage began to collapse, as Kirsten Swinth points out in ‘Feminism’s Forgotten Fight: The Unfinished Struggle for Work and Family’ (Harvard).”  

Kirsten Swinth

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Prof. Asif Siddiqi publishes “Whose India? SITE and the origins of satellite television in India” in History and Technology: An International Journal.

Prof. Asif Siddiqi publishes “Whose India? SITE and the origins of satellite television in India” in History and Technology: An International Journal.

Below is the abstract:

This essay explores the origins of the Satellite Instructional Technology Experiment (SITE), a project that used a NASA satellite to beam educational programs to over two thousand villages in India in the mid-1970s. Touted as a major success in using advanced technology for the purposes of poverty alleviation, the results of the project remain contested. I argue that the causes of its ambiguous outcome can be traced to the late 1960s when Indian and American scientific elites mobilized support for this project by uniting a coalition of diverse actors that each imagined a different ‘India’. Although each of these ‘Indias’ represented a starkly different vision of the nation, they were consonant for a brief historical moment, thus enabling SITE to come to reality. Their ability to do so depended on framing as monolithic and passive, the one population central to the project, the ‘poor and illiterate’ of India.

Asif Siddiqi
Asif Siddiqi

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Prof. Asif Siddiqi is Featured in The National Geographic.

Professor Asif Siddiqui was featured in an October 7, 2020, National Geographic article, “How the ‘right stuff’ to be an astronaut has changed over the years.”

Prof. Siddiqi is quoted:

“They’re green,” says Fordham University history professor Asif Siddiqi of the first group of cosmonauts. “You essentially have the space program mold and shape them.”

The author Jay Bennett continues, “As the U.S. and U.S.S.R. gained experience flying people in space, they began to attempt more complicated missions, such as docking in orbit and sending astronauts outside their spacecraft. In the astronaut selection process, the two space programs put more emphasis on engineering education, and the Soviet program raised its standards for flight time, making the second group of astronauts older and more experienced than the first, Siddiqui says. Buzz Aldrin, selected in the third group of NASA astronauts in 1963, was the first person to join the corps with a doctoral degree (in astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology).”

Asif Siddiqi

You can follow Prof. Asif Siddiqi on Twitter @historyasif.

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Prof. Kirsten Swinth Publishes “What Ruth Bader Ginsburg Learned From Swedish Social Democracy” in the Jacobin Magazine.

On September 29, 2020, Prof. Kirsten Swinth published, “What Ruth Bader Ginsburg Learned From Swedish Social Democracy,” in Jacobin Magazine.

She begins the article by writing: “The pioneering sex-discrimination law casebook that Ruth Bader Ginsburg published with two of her colleagues in 1974 closes, after nine-hundred and twenty-seven pages, with a brief chapter of “Comparative Side-Glances.” Ginsburg and her colleagues avowed a “modest purpose” for the pages that followed. They sought merely “to suggest the breadth of the movement toward equal rights for men and women” that went well beyond the borders of the United States. The side-glances, however, had a rather surprising focus: Sweden.”

You can read more here.

Kirsten Swinth

You can follow Prof. Kirsten Swinth on Twitter @kswinth.

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Prof. Steven Stoll Publishes “Charlie Chaplin and Karl Marx in Conversation: On Working and Being in Modern Times” in Public Seminar.

On September 21, 2020, Professor Steven Stoll published, “Charlie Chaplin and Karl Marx in Conversation: On Working and Being in Modern Times,” in the Public Seminar,” in Public Seminar.

Stoll writes: “At a time when some predict that the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic could leave many unemployed for months or years, and when the working-class already endures the worst of everything, in a rolling crisis of despair, Modern Times doesn’t look like an excavated relic but a message from the dawn of the American Century to its dusk. The story of the Worker, played by Chaplin, and his homeless partner, the Gamin, played by Paulette Goddard, depicts alienation and disillusionment with capitalism, law enforcement, and the world of industrial work that had failed the working class.”

You can read the full article here.

Prof. Steven Stoll

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Prof. Westenley Alcenat Makes Media Appearances on Scope & TRT World.

Here are the links to Prof. Alcenat’s two most recent media appearances:

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In Memoriam the Victims of the El Paso Massacre, August 3, 2019

On Saturday, August 3, 2019, in El Paso, Texas, a 21 year old white male brandishing a semi-automatic rifle walked into a Walmart known to be popular with Americans and a convenient destination for Mexicans crossing the nearby border for their weekly shopping excursion into the United States. He began to shoot, deliberately targeting people of apparent Mexican and Latin  American descent. Twenty three people died in the shooting (the last dying in April of 2020), and another twenty three were injured. News organizations identified the dead as thirteen United States Americans, eight Mexicans, and one German citizen.  A deeper look, though, reveals that of the thirteen Americans killed, eleven were of Latinx descent. As a result, the El Paso Walmart shooting was the worst mass murder of Latino people in modern American history. 

The murderer has been identified as a white supremacist with a deep hatred of Latinos, someone who consumed white supremacist literature and wrote a manifesto at the time of the shooting. This is not a surprise, as in the last five years the United States also has suffered mass shootings of African Americans (Charleston, June 17, 2015) and Jews (October 27, 2018). In his manifesto, the shooter argued that Mexicans specifically, and Latinxs generally, are invading the United States, taking jobs away from U.S. citizens, and endangering the white majority populace. This rhetoric reveals anti-Latinx sentiments with roots deep in United States history. It also calls attention to the historical and continuous race-based and structural violence that affects minority communities in the U.S. and at the border.

Father McShane has suggested that the Fordham community commemorate and discuss these tragedies in November. For now, though, it is important to mourn the victims of August 3 and to remember how and why they died:

Andre Anchondo, 23

Jordan Anchondo, 24

Arturo Benavides, 60

Leonard Cipeda Campos, 41

Angelina Englisbee, 86

Maria Flores, 77

Raul Flores, 77

Guillermo Garcia, 36

Jorge Calvillo García, 61

Maribel Hernandez, 56

Adolfo Cerros Hernandez, 68

Alexander Gerhard Hoffman, 66

David Alvah Johnson, 63

Luis Alfonso Juarez, 90

Ivan Hilierto Manzano, 46

Gloria Irma Marquez

Elsa Mendoza Márquez, 57

Margie Reckard, 63

Sara Esther Regalado, 66

Javier Rodriguez, 15

María Eugenia Legarreta Rothe, 58

Teresa Sánchez de Freitas, 82

Juan Velázquez, 77

Father McShane asked the University Church to offer the Sunday (August 2) Mass on behalf of the victims and the El Paso community, an appropriate gesture for a community and a people very serious about their religious faith.

For our part, we mourn the dead and summon the living to reflect on what we can do to support our own communities.  The El Paso Museum of History will display a digital memorial in remembrance of August 3. The public can join virtually by submitting pictures and memories on Digital El Paso at http://www.digie.org. We invite you to take part and encourage everyone to become active in supporting some of those organizations working on behalf of our communities in El Paso, the Southwest, and in New York. We can best honor the dead by fighting for and supporting justice at home and around the nation: 

Local

Central American Legal Assistance: https://www.centralamericanlegal.info/

Latino Pride Center: http://www.latinopridecenter.org/
Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education https://www.casitamaria.org/ 

St. Jerome H.A.N.D.S Community Center: https://jeromehands.com/

Texas

In El Paso, Annunciation House, which has worked to house and support migrants and refugees on the border::  https://annunciationhouse.org/

Raices Texas: The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services  https://www.raicestexas.org/ways-to-give/donate/

Border Network for Human Rights: https://bnhr.org/about/history/

National

The Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights: https://www.theyoungcenter.org/

The National Day Laborer Organizing Network: https://ndlon.org/

United We Dream: https://unitedwedream.org/

In solidarity, 
David Myers and Stephanie Huezo (with help from William Hogue)

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Professor Nana Osei-Opare published “When It Comes to America’s Race Issues, Russia Is a Bogeyman” in Foreign Policy Magazine.

On July 6, 2020, Fordham history Professor Nana Osei-Opare published an op-ed piece in Foreign Policy Magazine called, “When It Comes to America’s Race Issues, Russia Is a Bogeyman.”

You can read the piece on this link: https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/07/06/when-it-comes-to-americas-race-issues-russia-is-a-bogeyman/

You can follow him on Twitter @NanaOseiOpare.

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