Category Archives: Faculty News

“Retracing Power: Authority, Conflict, and Resistance in History,” Fordham History Graduate Student Workshop on Friday, March 5, 2021.

Register here for Zoom link

“Retracing Power:Authority, Conflict, and Resistance in History”

Graduate Student Workshop

Sponsored by the O’Connell Initiative for Global Capitalism

Fordham University, Department of History

Friday, March 5, 2021

Zoom

9:00am Welcome and Opening Remarks

David Hamlin (Fordham University)

Panel 1 Authority and Conflict in Law and Medicine

9:30 – 11:00am Grace Shen (Fordham University) – Commentator

“She Behaved as a Doctor”: Empirics and 

Enforcement in the Pastoral Visitations of 

Late Medieval Catalonia

Rachel Podd (Fordham University)

Orientations: Re-Defining the Direction of 

Heterosexual Desire

Sean Cosgrove (Cornell University)

Chemical Conversations: Scientific Investigations

and Medical Punishments in the Soviet Union’s 

Special Hospitals

Garret McDonald (Fordham University)

11:00 – 11:15am Break

Panel 2 Power Struggles of Governance and Citizenship

11:15am-12:45pm Nana Osei-Opare (Fordham University) – Commentator

The Nahaman River Milling Dispute, and the Thirteenth-Century Energy Crisis of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem

Tobias Hyrnick (Fordham University)

Asantean noumena: The politics and 

imaginary reconstruction of the Asante Palace

Tony Yeboah (Yale University)

12:45 – 2:00pm Lunch Break

Panel 3  Unfree Labor 

2:00-3:30pm Samantha Iyer (Fordham University) – Commentator 

Corvée Labor and the Politics of Popular 

Insurrection in Trois-Rivières, 1760-1776

Richard Tomczak (Stony Brook University)

Choose Your Human Rights Battles Wisely: 

The Kennedy Administration, the United Nations, 

and the Saudi Arabian Slave Trade

Nicholas DeAntonis (Fordham University)

Commerce, Identity, and Mobility in the Dangme 

Littoral of the Eastern Gold Coast, 1850s—1870s 

Ishmael Annang (Georgetown University)

3:30 – 3:45pm Break

Panel 4 Political Cultures

3:45-5:00pm              Amanda Armstrong-Price (Fordham University) – Commentator

Culture Wars: Arnoldian Culture in Late Nineteenth 

and Early Twentieth Century Britain

Jarrett Moran (Graduate Center, City University of New York)

Structuring spontaneity: The twilight of anarchist 

organization in Spain and Italy, c. 1917-1923

William Whitham (Princeton University)

5:00 – 5:15pm Break

5:15-6:15pm Retracing Power, Refiguring History: Haunted Bauhaus

and a New History of Modernism

Dr. Elizabeth Otto (SUNY Buffalo)

6:15-6:30pm Closing Remarks

Asif Siddiqi (Fordham University)

6:30pm Cocktails and Celebration

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Filed under Conferences, Faculty News, Fordham News, Global History, Grad Student News, Graduate Student

Prof. Kirsten Swinth’s work featured in The New Yorker.

Prof. Jill Lepore’s January 11, 2021, article, “What’s Wrong With the Way We Work,” featured Prof. Kirsten Swinth’s work. Lepore writes, “Plenty of people still feel that way about their jobs. But Terkel’s interviews, conducted in the early seventies, captured the end of an era. Key labor-movement achievements—eight hours a day, often with health care and a pension—unravelled. The idea of the family wage began to collapse, as Kirsten Swinth points out in ‘Feminism’s Forgotten Fight: The Unfinished Struggle for Work and Family’ (Harvard).”  

Kirsten Swinth

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Prof. Christopher Dietrich publishes “Erasing the Marks of Domination: Economic Sovereignty, Decolonization, and International Lawmaking in the 1950s and 1960s” in Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d’histoire du droit international.

Prof. Christopher Dietrich publishes “Erasing the Marks of Domination: Economic Sovereignty, Decolonization, and International Lawmaking in the 1950s and 1960s” in Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d’histoire du droit international.

Below is the abstract:

This article tells a legal and intellectual history of oil and decolonization in the 1950s and 1960s through the projects of international institutions including the UN Permanent Sovereignty Commission and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and the work of anti-colonial lawyers Hasan Zakariya and Nicolas Sarkis. It examines the ideas and infrastructure of decolonization as they related to the question of how international law could be used to win economic sovereignty.

Christopher Dietrich
Christopher Dietrich

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Prof. Asif Siddiqi publishes “Whose India? SITE and the origins of satellite television in India” in History and Technology: An International Journal.

Prof. Asif Siddiqi publishes “Whose India? SITE and the origins of satellite television in India” in History and Technology: An International Journal.

Below is the abstract:

This essay explores the origins of the Satellite Instructional Technology Experiment (SITE), a project that used a NASA satellite to beam educational programs to over two thousand villages in India in the mid-1970s. Touted as a major success in using advanced technology for the purposes of poverty alleviation, the results of the project remain contested. I argue that the causes of its ambiguous outcome can be traced to the late 1960s when Indian and American scientific elites mobilized support for this project by uniting a coalition of diverse actors that each imagined a different ‘India’. Although each of these ‘Indias’ represented a starkly different vision of the nation, they were consonant for a brief historical moment, thus enabling SITE to come to reality. Their ability to do so depended on framing as monolithic and passive, the one population central to the project, the ‘poor and illiterate’ of India.

Asif Siddiqi
Asif Siddiqi

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Congratulations! Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s Book Receives Susan Socolow-Lyman Johnson Prize from the Conference on Latin American History.

Prof. S. Elizabeth Penry’s The People Are King: The Making of an Indigenous Andean Politics received the Susan Socolow-Lyman Johnson Prize. The People Are King has also been awarded the Flora Tristán Prize.

The People Are King

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Prof. Huezo to give a presentation at the Latin American Philosophy of Education Society (LAPES) on October 23.

The Latin American Philosophy of Education Society (LAPES) is hosting their final two events for their online symposium, Learning Across Liberation Theologies, to explore the links between liberation theology, pedagogy, and activism. We gather front-line educators, movement organizers, and practitioners and scholars of Liberation Theology to address these themes. This week the themes are “Caribbean/Latin American Liberation Theologies.” and “Black Radical Tradition”

Prof. Stephanie Huezo will be giving a presentation entitled “Pedagogy, Community, and Survival in the Salvadoran Revolution” on Friday, October 23, 2020, from 6-8pm ET. The presentation will be in English with Spanish interpretation.


Friday, Oct. 23: Caribbean/Latin American Liberation Theologies (with Spanish interpretation)

Speakers:

 ● Sylvia Marcos, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and Universidad Iberamericana – Keynote 

● Stephanie M. Huezo, Fordham University 

● Tito Mitjans Alayón, CESMECA, UNICACHModerated by Conor Tomás Reed, CUNY 

Saturday, Oct. 24: Black Radical Tradition

Speakers: 

● Mark L. Taylor, Princeton Theological Seminary – Keynote 

● Rashad Moore, First Baptist Church of Crown Heights and Columbia University

● Sharon Gramby-Sobukwe, Eastern University

Moderated by Jason Wozniak, West Chester University

Registration: https://bit.ly/2FoerN5

YouTube livestream: www.youtube.com/RafaelVizcainoR

Stephanie Huezo
Stephanie Huezo

You can follow Prof. Stephanie Huezo on Twitter @steph_huezo.

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Prof. Kirsten Swinth Publishes “What Ruth Bader Ginsburg Learned From Swedish Social Democracy” in the Jacobin Magazine.

On September 29, 2020, Prof. Kirsten Swinth published, “What Ruth Bader Ginsburg Learned From Swedish Social Democracy,” in Jacobin Magazine.

She begins the article by writing: “The pioneering sex-discrimination law casebook that Ruth Bader Ginsburg published with two of her colleagues in 1974 closes, after nine-hundred and twenty-seven pages, with a brief chapter of “Comparative Side-Glances.” Ginsburg and her colleagues avowed a “modest purpose” for the pages that followed. They sought merely “to suggest the breadth of the movement toward equal rights for men and women” that went well beyond the borders of the United States. The side-glances, however, had a rather surprising focus: Sweden.”

You can read more here.

Kirsten Swinth

You can follow Prof. Kirsten Swinth on Twitter @kswinth.

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Prof. Steven Stoll Publishes “Charlie Chaplin and Karl Marx in Conversation: On Working and Being in Modern Times” in Public Seminar.

On September 21, 2020, Professor Steven Stoll published, “Charlie Chaplin and Karl Marx in Conversation: On Working and Being in Modern Times,” in the Public Seminar,” in Public Seminar.

Stoll writes: “At a time when some predict that the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic could leave many unemployed for months or years, and when the working-class already endures the worst of everything, in a rolling crisis of despair, Modern Times doesn’t look like an excavated relic but a message from the dawn of the American Century to its dusk. The story of the Worker, played by Chaplin, and his homeless partner, the Gamin, played by Paulette Goddard, depicts alienation and disillusionment with capitalism, law enforcement, and the world of industrial work that had failed the working class.”

You can read the full article here.

Prof. Steven Stoll

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Prof. Westenley Alcenat Makes Media Appearances on Scope & TRT World.

Here are the links to Prof. Alcenat’s two most recent media appearances:

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In Memoriam the Victims of the El Paso Massacre, August 3, 2019

On Saturday, August 3, 2019, in El Paso, Texas, a 21 year old white male brandishing a semi-automatic rifle walked into a Walmart known to be popular with Americans and a convenient destination for Mexicans crossing the nearby border for their weekly shopping excursion into the United States. He began to shoot, deliberately targeting people of apparent Mexican and Latin  American descent. Twenty three people died in the shooting (the last dying in April of 2020), and another twenty three were injured. News organizations identified the dead as thirteen United States Americans, eight Mexicans, and one German citizen.  A deeper look, though, reveals that of the thirteen Americans killed, eleven were of Latinx descent. As a result, the El Paso Walmart shooting was the worst mass murder of Latino people in modern American history. 

The murderer has been identified as a white supremacist with a deep hatred of Latinos, someone who consumed white supremacist literature and wrote a manifesto at the time of the shooting. This is not a surprise, as in the last five years the United States also has suffered mass shootings of African Americans (Charleston, June 17, 2015) and Jews (October 27, 2018). In his manifesto, the shooter argued that Mexicans specifically, and Latinxs generally, are invading the United States, taking jobs away from U.S. citizens, and endangering the white majority populace. This rhetoric reveals anti-Latinx sentiments with roots deep in United States history. It also calls attention to the historical and continuous race-based and structural violence that affects minority communities in the U.S. and at the border.

Father McShane has suggested that the Fordham community commemorate and discuss these tragedies in November. For now, though, it is important to mourn the victims of August 3 and to remember how and why they died:

Andre Anchondo, 23

Jordan Anchondo, 24

Arturo Benavides, 60

Leonard Cipeda Campos, 41

Angelina Englisbee, 86

Maria Flores, 77

Raul Flores, 77

Guillermo Garcia, 36

Jorge Calvillo García, 61

Maribel Hernandez, 56

Adolfo Cerros Hernandez, 68

Alexander Gerhard Hoffman, 66

David Alvah Johnson, 63

Luis Alfonso Juarez, 90

Ivan Hilierto Manzano, 46

Gloria Irma Marquez

Elsa Mendoza Márquez, 57

Margie Reckard, 63

Sara Esther Regalado, 66

Javier Rodriguez, 15

María Eugenia Legarreta Rothe, 58

Teresa Sánchez de Freitas, 82

Juan Velázquez, 77

Father McShane asked the University Church to offer the Sunday (August 2) Mass on behalf of the victims and the El Paso community, an appropriate gesture for a community and a people very serious about their religious faith.

For our part, we mourn the dead and summon the living to reflect on what we can do to support our own communities.  The El Paso Museum of History will display a digital memorial in remembrance of August 3. The public can join virtually by submitting pictures and memories on Digital El Paso at http://www.digie.org. We invite you to take part and encourage everyone to become active in supporting some of those organizations working on behalf of our communities in El Paso, the Southwest, and in New York. We can best honor the dead by fighting for and supporting justice at home and around the nation: 

Local

Central American Legal Assistance: https://www.centralamericanlegal.info/

Latino Pride Center: http://www.latinopridecenter.org/
Casita Maria Center for Arts and Education https://www.casitamaria.org/ 

St. Jerome H.A.N.D.S Community Center: https://jeromehands.com/

Texas

In El Paso, Annunciation House, which has worked to house and support migrants and refugees on the border::  https://annunciationhouse.org/

Raices Texas: The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services  https://www.raicestexas.org/ways-to-give/donate/

Border Network for Human Rights: https://bnhr.org/about/history/

National

The Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights: https://www.theyoungcenter.org/

The National Day Laborer Organizing Network: https://ndlon.org/

United We Dream: https://unitedwedream.org/

In solidarity, 
David Myers and Stephanie Huezo (with help from William Hogue)

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