Tag Archives: Oil

What is Global History at Fordham? (Part 2 – Prof. Chris Dietrich)

This is part of 2 of our new series, “What is Global History at Fordham?” Today, we hear from Professor Chris Dietrich, a member of Fordham’s Global History consortium, on what global history means to him and how it shapes his work.

“As a historian of U.S. foreign relations, the perspectives offered by a Global History methodology are invaluable to my research and writing on oil and decolonization.  It is impossible to understand the major questions faced by U.S. leaders without understanding the different contexts from which those questions arose.  In my own work, it has been fascinating to see how ideas and policies crossed traditional boundaries through international institutions like the Arab League, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, and the United Nations.  Opportunities abound in New York City, which is a wonderful place to conduct this sort of work for all sorts of reasons, but especially because of the proximity of crucial archives for understanding the place of the United States in the world.”

You can follow Prof. Chris Dietrich on Twitter @CRWDietrich

Chris Dietrich

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Filed under Faculty News, Faculty Profiles, Global History, On this Day at Fordham

Week Highlights

We are excited to announce just some of the fascinating activities members of the Fordham History Department have engaged in these last few weeks:

Prof. Rosemary Wakeman just edited and contributed an article to a special issue on “Shanghai: Heritage at the Crossroads of Culture” for the journal Built Heritage. The journal is published by the College of Architecture and Urban Planning at Tongji University in Shanghai. Her article on “Mid-Century Urban Avant-Gardes” compares Art Deco architecture in Shanghai and New York.

ISSUE 11 CONTENT | built-heritage
Prof. Rosemary Wakeman

Prof. Chris Dietrich just published a timely and thought-provoking piece in today’s Washington Post!” https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2019/09/27/how-war-forced-united-states-rethink-politics-oil/

You can follow Prof. Chris Dietrich on Twitter @CRWDietrich

Prof. Chris Dietrich

Prof. Amanda Armstrong-Price gave a fascinating presentation at NYU entitled “Strains of Permissiveness, Fields of Force: Governing Intimacies along the Railways of Colonial India.” The talk was hosted by The Postcolonial, Race, and Diaspora Studies Colloquium at NYU. You can find more details of Prof. Armstrong-Price’s talk here: https://www.facebook.com/events/2525672297648631/

Prof. Amanda Armstrong-Price

Prof. Wes Alcenat recently published a thought-provoking piece, “Freedom Without Citizenship, Reconciliation without Reparations,” on the African American Intellectual Historical Society’s award-winning blog, “Black Perspectives.”  https://www.aaihs.org/freedom-without-citizenship-reconciliation-without-reparations/

You can follow Prof. Wes Alcenat on Twitter at @wesalcenat

Prof. Wes Alcenat

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Oil Revolution: Congratulations to Professor Christopher Dietrich

Chris and his book at the Bronx Beer Hall

Big news this week as Cambridge University Press announces the publication of the new book Oil Revolution:Anticolonial Elites, Sovereign Rights, and the Economic Culture of Decolonization by Fordham History’s own Professor Christopher Dietrich. The eagerly awaited volume is the result of many years of scholarship by Dietrich. Emerging from his doctoral work at the University of Texas at Austin, Dietrich’s book tackles a topic of major significance, not only for the history of twentieth-century US foreign relations, but to the shape of the world today:

According to the website of Cambridge University Press:

Through innovative and expansive research, Oil Revolution analyzes the tensions faced and networks created by anti-colonial oil elites during the age of decolonization following World War II. This new community of elites stretched across Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Algeria, and Libya. First through their western educations and then in the United Nations, the Arab League, and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, these elites transformed the global oil industry. Their transnational work began in the early 1950s and culminated in the 1973–4 energy crisis and in the 1974 declaration of a New International Economic Order in the United Nations. Christopher R. W. Dietrich examines how these elites brokered and balanced their ambitions via access to oil, the most important natural resource of the modern era.

The History Department remembers fondly when leading scholars in Dietrich’s field, including  Mark Bradley of the University of Chicago, Monica Kim of NYU and Craig Daigle at City College joined Fordham’s own Asif Siddiqi and other faculty and students to workshop the book manuscript in the Spring semester of 2015. It was clear then that this was an exciting project, and the glowing series of endorsements from major figures in Dietrich’s field on the book’s back cover make it clear that he has brought the project to its full fruition. Congratulations Chris!

Oil Revolution: Anticolonial Elites, Soveriegn Rights, and the Economic Culture of Decolonization by Christopher Dietrich is currently available in paperback and hardback.

 

 

 

 

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Chris Dietrich Presents Research on Oil and Decolonization (Video)

Fordham history professor Christopher Dietrich gave a talk at the Center for International and Comparative Law at Mississippi College in early October.  He discussed his recent research on Middle Eastern oil elites and their place in the world in the aftermath of decolonization Luckily for us, his talk was recorded on video and is now available here:

 

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