Tag Archives: Fordham Grad Students

Big News from History’s Own Dr. Louie Valencia-García (PhD ’16)

We’ve got lots of big news to announce from our recent alumnus, Dr. Louie Valencia-García! Louie wrote to let us know that he has just been appointed Assistant Professor of Digital History at Texas State University.  Texas State is located about 25 minutes south of Austin in San Marcos, Texas. He will be be teaching in the Department of History, and the Public History Program, teaching graduate students and undergraduates digital methodologies and European history.
For the past year, Louie has been a Lecturer on History of Literature for the Committee on Degrees on History and Literature, an Honors concentration at Harvard University. Louie writes
My time at Harvard has been absolutely fabulous. I have had the chance to work with amazing colleagues, students, and have taken advantage of all the resources available to faculty members. While the contract was renewable for up to three years, I decided to jump at the opportunity at Texas State.
My book, Antiauthoritarian Youth Culture: Clashing with Fascism, is under contract with Bloomsbury Academic, and will be published in 2018 (the cover of my book and a photo is here: http://scholar.harvard.edu/valencia/about). I’m particularly excited to start moving my own research to a focus on knowledge creation, youth culture, and activism in the digital age by researching HIV/AIDS research and knowledge distribution in Europe in the 1980s/90s.  Currently, I am also a Research Editor for the new monthly digital journal of the Council for European Studies at Columbia University, EuropeNow (europenowjournal.org). I am expecting articles to be published in Contemporary European History and European Comic Art, amongst others. I am also contributing an article to Asif Siddiqi and Simon Reynold’s upcoming volume, One-Track Mind.

Louie Valencia-García’s new book, forthcoming from Bloomsbury.

The new job means a lot to Louie: he graduated from Texas State University in 2007 with degrees in the European Studies and Spanish Literature, as well as minors in Medieval and Renaissance Studies and International Studies. He was the student commencement speaker, and he is “beyond excited to come home.” Of course we’re beyond excited too, and proud of our graduate. Way to go Louie!

 

 

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Congratulations to Kristin Uscinski!

(l-r) Wolfgang Mueller, Kristin Uscinski, David Myers and Maryanne Kowaleski

This past week Kristin Uscinski successfully defended her dissertation, entitled “Recipes for Women’s Healthcare in Medieval England”. Kristin’s mentor was Professor Maryanne Kowaleski, her readers were Professors Wolfgang Mueller and David Myers and Examiners were Professors Claire Gherini and Nicholas Paul.

In addition to defending, Kristin’s research also got a great write-up in Fordham News– go check it out!

 

 

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Filed under Doctoral Defenses, Grad Student News

History 2016 Award Winners Honored at GSAS Celebration

 

GSAS Award Winners 2016: (l-r) Jonathan Wood (Alumni Dissertation Fellowship), Sal Cipriano (Senior Teaching Fellowship), Melissa Arredia (GSAS Summer Fellowship), Jeffrey Doolittle (Research Fellowship), Michael Sanders (ACHA Assistantship), Elizabeth Stack (Higher Education Learning Junior Fellow), Christopher Rose (Vice President, Graduate Student Association)

Last week the Fordham Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS)  held their annual award ceremony for winners of fellowships and prizes administered internally at Fordham. This year’s was a special ceremony, as the GSAS also celebrated its Centennial. GSAS Dean Eva Badowska spoke about the history of the Graduate School and unveiled a digital timeline of its history. Read on to find out more about our award winners in 2016 & 2017.

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Upcoming Digital Humanities Workshop with Alisa Beer

Last week was NYCDH Week 2017 — the week each year when the NYC Digital Humanities (DH) community gets together to discuss their projects, run workshops, and bring the NYC DH community together.

One feature of the kick-off meeting on Monday was a series of Lightning Talks: five minute mini-presentations about DH projects in the works. Presentations ranged from personal research to new departmental makerspaces and showed the breadth of DH projects and interests in the greater NYC area!

Fordham History Department Ph.D. student Alisa Beer gave a lightning talk about a DH project she is running at Columbia University as part of her spring 2017 internship with the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library at Columbia.

The workshop, called “Digital Editing and the Medieval Manuscript Roll” will take place on March 24-25 for Columbia University graduate students. Participants will learn the fundamentals of digital editing while tackling the codicological challenges posed by medieval manuscripts. Practical sessions will inform collective editorial decision-making: participants will undertake the work of transcription and commentary, and tag (according to TEI 5 protocols) the text and images of one medieval manuscript roll from the Columbia collection. The workshop will result in a collaborative digital edition of Plimpton Add. Ms. 04, a roll of the Fifteen Oes of Saint Bridget.

Plimpton Add. Ms. 04

Click here for more information on the workshop and its goals, structure, and outcomes.

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Postcard: A Bury Fun Summer

TBD

The Ruins at Bury St. Edmunds

Thanks to the History Department’s Leahey fellowship for summer travel, graduate student and medievalist Louisa Foroughi was able to spend five weeks in June and July visiting archives in England and Scotland (with a very brief Welsh detour!). Louisa’s dissertation focuses on the origins and social significance of the English “yeomen,” a group situated at the mid-point of the social scale, who made their first appearance in the early fifteenth century and quickly rose to prominence under the Tudors. She spent ten days in London and Chester tracking down a yeomen family from a small town near Chester, during which time she snuck in a quick jaunt across the Welsh border, a mere 30 minute walk from the city walls! She spent a further two weeks gathering probate records in local record offices in Norwich, Bury St. Edmunds, and Ipswich, all favorite haunts. She is now in possession of c. 377 wills and inventories produced by husbandmen, yeomen, and gentlemen from 1348-1538, one of the three main document times upon which her dissertation will be based. While in England, Louisa also presented a paper on Archbishops’ Registers at the International Medieval Congress at Leeds and attended the Anglo-American Seminar with Professor Maryanne Kowaleski. She is happy to be back in the US, and looks forward to finally being able to answer the question, “what is a yeomen?”

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Postcard: A Seminar in Stirling

TBD

Louisa Foroughi confers with Professor Bruce Campbell

From July 8th to 11th Fordham Professor Maryanne Kowaleski and graduate student Louisa Foroughi attended the XIIth Annual Anglo-American Seminar on the Medieval Economy and Society, held this year in Stirling, Scotland. The Anglo-American Seminar is a long-standing gathering of some of the most distinguished economic and social historians in England and America. This year’s presentations drew attention to new directions in research, while its panel discussion featured lively debate about the relationship between government policy and England’s economy in the late middle ages. Professor Kowaleski closed the conference with a fascinating paper on the political participation and consciousness of mariners in late medieval England, part of her larger work on England’s seamen and coastal communities. A highlight of this year’s Seminar was a (rainy!) walking tour of the town of Stirling, all the way from the castle at the top of the hill to the fish stews at its base, led by Professor Richard Oram, who also opened the conference with an excellent talk on the environmental history of Scotland and its neglected relationship to political history. Louisa especially benefited from the opportunity to meet and talk over her thesis with experts in their field, such as Prof. Bruce Campbell, who was also honored with the presentation of a festschrift at the conference.

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Postcard: An Afternoon with Creighton Berry

Creighton Berry and Damien Strecker

Creighton Berry (left) and History PhD student Damien Strecker

Continuing our Summer Postcards series, PhD student Damien Strecker tells us about an interview he conducted as part of his research on the history of St. Augustine Church in the South Bronx with Creighton Berry, a former member of its congregation. Read Damien’s account of his illuminating trip below. Continue reading

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Fordham History Alum Darryl E. Brock Appointed Assistant Professor at CUNY’s Borough of Manhattan Community College

Fordham History PhD Darryl Brock

Fordham History PhD Darryl Brock

Fordham History Ph.D. graduate Darryl E. Brock (2014) has been appointed an Assistant Professor of Latino Studies starting fall semester 2016 at CUNY’s Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC). He will work in the Center for Ethnic Studies, a program that focus on Latino, African-American and Asian studies. At Fordham his primary advisor was the late Dr. Christopher Schmidt-Nowara with his dissertation committee also containing Drs. Hector Lindo-Fuentes and Asif Siddiqi. Darryl’s dissertation is under contract with the University of Alabama Press for publication in 2017 as Botanical Monroe Doctrine and American Empire: The Scientific Survey of Puerto Rico. At BMCC he looks forward to working with study abroad programs and undergraduate research, including expansion of his research program to look at how Puerto Ricans mediated U.S. colonial science into broader Latin America.

Since graduating from Fordham, Darryl has received the Taiwan Fellowship which entailed his spending five months last year researching under the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Taiwan’s public diplomacy in Latin America. That work led to publications in Eurasia News and the Taiwan Review. Since then, he has received a Fulbright Scholar Award to teach at the National University of Singapore (NUS) during Spring Semester of 2017. As an NUS Senior Visiting Fellow, Darryl will teach two courses of his creation, “Science, Technology and Imperialism in Global History,” and “May Fourth to Mao: Science in Modern China.” The latter course, in large part, will be based on his co-edited work Mr. Science and Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution (Lexington, 2013).

Many congratulations Darryl, we are all very proud of you!

 

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Summer Postcard: The Medievalist’s “Grand Tour”

Eastbridge Pilgrim Hospital, Canterbury

Eastbridge Pilgrim Hospital, Canterbury

The next postcard in our series about the summer wanderings and adventures of Fordham historians sees PhD candidate Lucy Barnhouse undertake a medievalist’s version of the Grand Tour, presenting papers at the International Medieval Congress in Leeds, at Canterbury, and in Paris. Lucy reports:

“Leeds felt like something of a marathon on its own, and I was glad of the company of fellow Fordhamites Esther Cuenca and Louisa Foroughi. From our shared apartment we struck out for long but productive days of conferencing. Besides specialized panels galore, we got to enjoy medieval-inspired street food. It made good fortification for a series of panels on the social identities of medieval lepers.

Leper Hospital at Harbledown

Eastridge Pilgrim Hospital (interior)

From Leeds, I went directly to Canterbury, where the conference of the Society for the Social History of Medicine was hosted. The conference organizers gave us the chance to tour local sites of interest. Having predictably chosen to visit the pilgrim hospital of Eastbridge, I and some other medievalists proceeded on a self-guided tour of more of Canterbury’s historical architecture. After the conference—at which I presented alongside historians of the antebellum American South and twentieth-century England on the shared theme of hospitals in urban communities—I hiked out to Harbledown to see the twelfth-century leper hospital.

The last stop on the Grand Tour was Paris, where I attended my first meeting of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing. I got to spend time with Alisa Beer, to meet new scholars, and to hear many interesting papers. Conference delegates also got free admission to the exhibits at the Bibliothèque Nationale, where we were hosted. Paris being Paris, I also consumed a truly alarming quantity of delicious pastries, and the conference wine-and-cheese reception was a gastronomic tour-de-force. Arguably more important was the fact that I got lots of encouragement to develop the paper I presented for a possible postdoc project. Now it’s back to the considerably less glamorous work of editing the dissertation!”

Thanks Lucy! And to all those Fordham historians on their summer adventures: keep those postcards coming!

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What do Historians do in the Summertime? Postcard from Scotland.

View from the Edinburgh University Library special collections reading room:

View from the Edinburgh University Library special collections reading room

Many people unfamiliar with the world of scholarship assume that the summer break between the Spring and Fall semesters is a time for holidays and relaxation. But for historians, the respite from teaching and classes means that summer is often the time when research, writing, conference going, and travel to archives, kicks into high gear.

Our first postcard this summer comes from PhD student Salvatore Cipriano. Supported by a Fordham GSAS Research Support Grant and a Graduate Student Association Professional Development Grant, Sal has been in Scotland since June 1.

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